Bronze Nearcha
S7: Female, Body, profile
Ellura
Spring Taxeotis
 
    
Bronze Nearcha (Nearcha sp)Class: Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Insects (Insecta)
Order: Butterflies & Moths (Lepidoptera)
Family: Geometer (:Geometridae Oenochrominae)
Species: Bronze Nearcha (Nearcha sp)
This Photo:     S7: Female, ventral

Thank you Peter Marriott for identifying this species for us

Thank you Marilyn Hewish for identifying this species for us

General Species Information:
Found on Ellura (in the Murray Mallee)
Marilyn kindly let us know this was not Amelora catacris, and that emergence time/month was an important factor in moth identification. Peter then said "... Taxeotis only have threadlike antennae - females and males - see MoV 4 on page 15. So it is 99% likely to be Nearcha - males pectinate on both sides and females threadlike". As such, it is most likely an undescribed species.

We found & captured 15 specimens of this species on 10 Sept 2017; equally males & females. They were quite variable and photo artefacts played havoc. eg notice the white spots hide easily depending on the camera/lighting angle. The bronze colour also washed out easily in flash light.
The females we found appeared to have stronger markings than males; this may not always be the case.
These beautiful moths range from plain, pale brown to a magic bronze colour. We have grouped the photo's by male & female, to show differences between specimens.
Males are about 10mm long, with wingspan of 25mm. Female bodies are a bit shorter at about 8mm long, but with the same wingspan as the male. The under-wings don't appear much different between the genders, but the ventral shots show the significant difference in the body shapes; with males being long & thin, females short & fat.

Copyright © 2017- Brett & Marie Smith. All Rights Reserved. Photographed 11-Sep-2017
This species is an Australian Native Species