Little Button
Compound Flower Opening
Ellura
Little Button
Compound Flower Open
 
    
Little Button (Leptorhynchos tetrachaetus)Class: Plant (Plantae) - Daisies
Order: Asterales
Family: Daisy (Asteraceae)
Species: Little Button (Leptorhynchos tetrachaetus)
This Photo:     True Buds & Flowers
Other name: Beauty Buttons
Similar Species: Wirewort

EXTRA - Photo Specific Information:
This is an excellent example of a compound flower showing:
1. Many Buds in the Middle &
2. Many Flowers open around the edge.
NB: The flowers are tubular and each have 5 petals.
HOW COOL IS THAT

When you compare to the Wirewort flower above you can see microscopic differences in the flowers. Both have 5 petals, but the Wirewort is a more slender tube flower. Their petals also stand up more. Here you can see the Button flower petals roll back a bit.
General Species Information:
Found on Ellura (in the Murray Mallee)
A small, yellow flowering, annual forb with long, hairy green leaves that flatten out then roll with age. Leaf back is felted.
Starting bushy, they become slender as they flower. Their stems also turn red / copper as they age.
The flowers are identical to wireworts. We have to turn the flower over and look at the back to tell the difference. Wireworts have black, curved, hairy backs (sepals) set in greeny white wool. Little Buttons have appendages (like minute leaves) set in white wool. The appendages are copper coloured in the bud, fading to beige in the flower.
The main difference with the structure is that these have leaves up the flower stem. Whereas wireworts only have basal leaves.
We'd say these flowers are, on average, a bit smaller than wirewort flowers. Individual wireworts can be significantly larger.
Little Buttons are in bud almost from germination making them easy to ID early, unlike wireworts.
Photos concentrate on the significant changes as it grows.

Copyright © 2013- Brett & Marie Smith. All Rights Reserved. Photographed 24-Nov-2013
This species is classed as RA (Rare) in the Murray Mallee, by DENR (Regional Species Status Assessments, July 2010)