Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach, SA, 5354
                      
It's possible 20 different species can look identical (needing dissection to differentiate); as such many id's here don't go to species level
Stat'NotesThumbnails: 139.   34 native species listed, with 23 from Ellura
Animals (Animalia) - Segmented Worms (Annelida) - Earthworms (Oligochaeta)
Earthworm
Crassiclitellata
Giant Worm
Megascolecidae
Giant Mt Lofty Earthworm
Gemascolex stirlingi?
Na
a
Our id here is based on location and size of worm.
There's a whole science based on identifying worms, much of which involves dissection.
We noticed these in Lobethal in heavy rain periods. They came up onto the concrete verandah as when the soil gets too sodden they can drown.
Size Perspective

Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Centipedes (Chilopoda)
Centipedes
Scolopendromorpha
Centipede
Scolopendridae
Giant Centipede
Ethmostigmus rubripes
Na
e m
A large (~90mm) common centipede with 4 simple eyes (per side), that hides under rocks, etc.
Dorsal
Breathing hole + eyes
Face
Posterior
"Teeth"
Anal
Ventral
Centipedes
Scolopendromorpha
Centipede
Scolopendridae
Giant Centipede
Scolopendridae sp
Na
e m a
 
House Centipedes
Scutigeromorpha
House Centipede
Scutigeridae
House Centipede
Allothereua maculata
Na
e m a
 

Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Springtails (Collembola)
Hairy Springtails
Entomobryomorpha
Hairy Springtail
Entomobryidae
Hairy Springtail
Entomobryidae sp ES01
Na
e m a
Very small, ~3mm long. They have a very scaly like surface. Similar to silverfish. There are two different body shapes here, which may be due to gender differences; or different species.
We have found a number of these in July & August.
Long Body
Dorsal
Profile
No Flash
Hairy Springtails
Entomobryomorpha
Hairy Springtail
Entomobryidae
White-spotted Hairy Springtail
Entomobryidae sp ES02
Na
a
We only found one of these in August, in a Helmet-hood Orchid leaf.
As with other springtails, very small.
Dorsal
Profile
Springtails
Poduromorpha
Springtail
Poduromorpha
Springtail
Poduromorpha sp
Na
e m a
Not a true insect. They are small (up to 3mm) and have 6 legs, 2 stumpy feelers & 2 eyes (made up of 8 ocelli). Dark pink underneath with dark purple backs.
Globular Springtails
Symphypleona
Globular Springtail
Symphypleona
Brown Globular Springtail
Symphypleona sp ES01
Na
e m
Similar Species: Varied Carpet Beetle (Anthrenus verbasci) 
Dorsal
Globular Springtails
Symphypleona
Globular Springtail
Symphypleona
Green Globular Springtail
Symphypleona sp ES02
Na
a
Not a true insect. They are small (we've measured under 2mm) and have 6 legs, 2 feelers & 2 eyes (made up of 8 ocelli). Look more like a spider with a distinct head and abdomen; unlike the other springtails.
Dorsal, ~1.3mm
Profile
Front
Globular Springtails
Symphypleona
Globular Springtail
Symphypleona
Globular Springtail
Symphypleona sp ES03
Na
e m
Eating a bracket fungi. These are tiny at <2mm long. We didn't realise it was there until publishing the bracket fungi photo
Dorsal

Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Millipedes (Diplopoda)
Millipedes
Polydesmida
Millipede
Paradoxosomatidae
Native Brown Millipede
Somethus cf castaneus ?


iNaturalist
Na
a
Thank you Dr Bob Mesibov for confirming the id of this species for us

Bob said it could either be S. castaneus or S. lancearius based on location.
Dorsal, ~34mm
Face, no eyes
Juliform Millipedes
Spirostreptida
Juliform Millipede
Spirostreptida
Juliform Millipede
Spirostreptida cf sp


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Dr Bob Mesibov for identifying this species for us

Of this specimen, Bob said "Very interesting, and probably a (native) spirostreptidan - never seen this patterning before, though!"

The legs on the 1st-5th segments are diagnostic, as are the eyes & genetalia. So it's important to try and photograph these areas clearly for id. As you can see, I wasn't able to. Everytime I turned it over, it turned back and ran.
In terms of colour (ie darkness & amount of orange coming through); this specimen varied considerably depending on the camera settings.
Twisted, darker
Size
5 Segment legs
Eyes
Fast

Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Insects (Insecta)
Earwigs
Dermaptera
Earwig
Forficulidae
European Earwig
Forficula auricularia


iNaturalist
If
e m a p
~14mm long plus pincers are a further ~7mm.
Found in the kitchen, so most likely came from produce (fresh vegetables).
Male: dorsal
Juvenile Female: dorsal
Male: profile
Male: Pincers
Male: Head
Male: Abdomen Segment Hairs
Male: ventral
Earwigs
Dermaptera
Striped Earwig
Labiduridae
Brown Native Earwig
Labidura riparia


iNaturalist
Na
e m
SynonymLabidura truncata

~17mm long, pincers ~5mm long.
A very distinctive orange "V" on the thorax. Very parallel sided abdomen.
Came to a night light sheet.
Found one specimen in March.
🔍Female, dorsal
🔍Female, profile
Earwigs
Dermaptera
Striped Earwig
Labiduridae
Black Bush Earwig
Nala lividipes


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Both male & female were measured at ~11mm long, excluding ~2.5mm pincers.
The genders can be separated as the male pincers are much further apart than the female.
We have found 4 specimens, 2 male & 2 female, in Oct, Dec & Feb.
Male: dorsal
Female: dorsal
Female: Tegmina
Male: ventral
Web-spinners
Embioptera
Web-spinner
Embioptera
Winged Web-spinner
Aposthonia gurneyi


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying this species for us

Matthew said: "There are several subspecies and specimens from Adelaide are apparently intermediate between A. g. gurneyi and A. g. centralis"
"The principle difference between the families is the structure of the male left cercus, which is heavily modified in the Notoligotomidae and Australembiidae (so that makes this one Oligotomidae - take a look at site)."
"From there we have two genera - Oligotoma, which is introduced and currently only known from Qld and NSW (and with slightly different proportions), and Aposthonia which is widespread. Two species are restricted to WA and a third to Qld, with A. gurneyi widespread. Full details of subspecies are at this site (although still under genus Oligotoma)"
Not all web-spinners are winged.
🔍Male, dorsal
Mayflies
Ephemeroptera
Mayfly
Baetidae
Mayfly
Centroptilum cf elongatum


iNaturalist
Na
a
1st Live Photo's on-line: This male was about 5mm long (head & body). The tail cerci are just under 9mm. The specimen we found keyed out to Centroptilum, and C. elongatum is the only one in this genus found in SA. It could of course be an undescribed species.
Notice the weird overhead eyes of the male; used for searching for a female (thank you to Ian Gibbins for confirming this assumption
When we mentioned we couldn't think of another invert' with a 2nd pair of compound eyes, Ian also told us that they are not strictly a 2nd pair of eyes; but a genetic situation where the normal eyes split during development. This is a similar trick to the way mantids, eg, have striped eyes; and other insects have different zones in their eyes for varying purposes. Pretty fascinating stuff
Male: Dorsal
🔍Male: Profile
🔍Male: Iso
Male: Upper Eyes
Male: Lower Eyes
Male: Oscelli
Male: Face
Male: Hindwings
Male: Wing Venation
Male: Lower Wing Venation
Male: Abdomen
Male: Antenna
Male: Thorax, dorsal
Male: Thorax, ventral
Male: Anal Pincers
Male: Ventral
Mayflies
Ephemeroptera
Mayfly
Baetidae
Mayfly
Cloeon cf paradieniense
Na
a
This female was about 6mm long, with 10mm long tail cerci, found dead. Notice it has no hind wings (a species trait), nor the strange eyes of the male.
To re-iterate, Mayflies are the only insects other than Flies (Diptera order) where some species have 2 wings not 4.
Female: Dorsal
Female: Profile
Female: Lower Wing Venation
Female: Wing Venation
Female: Thorax
Stick Insects
Phasmida
Stick Insect
Diapheromeridae
White's Stick Insect
Sipyloidea whitei


iNaturalist
Na
e m
~60mm long. Found at a night sheet.
When looking into what species it was we discovered that the shape of the anal segment, & whether it has wings or not, splits our stick insects into major groups.
The other thing that makes this one easy to identify is the black stripe running the full length down it's back ... well we couldn't check that exactly as the wings covered a lot of it
🔍Male, dorsal
🔍Male, profile
🔍Male, close up
🔍Male, Head
🔍Male, Anal Segment
Stick Insects
Phasmida
Stick Insect
Phasmatidae
Dog-eared Stick Insect
Hyrtacus tuberculatus


iNaturalist
Na
e m a
Other Common NameLobed-Abdomen Stick Insect

Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

The adult is about 50-55mm long
Adult Male, dorsal
Adult Male, head
Adult Male, abdomen spines
Adult Male, abdomen "tail"
Adult Male, ventral
Stick Insects
Phasmida
Stick Insect
Phasmatidae
Children's Stick Insect
Tropidoderus childrenii


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Ethan Beaver for identifying this species for us

Named after zoologist John George Children, not because children like them.
More details about him can be found here John George Children
Thank you to Frank Prinz & Martin Lagerwey for the link; via Bowerbird.
🔍Male, whole
🔍Male, Body
🔍Male, Head & Neck
🔍Male, Wings (closed)
Bark Lice
Psocodea
Bark Louse
Ectopsocidae
Bark Louse
Ectopsocus sp
Na
a
 
Bark Lice
Psocodea
Bark Louse
Psocidae
Bark Louse
Clematostigma cf maculiceps


iNaturalist
Na
e m
~3mm long.
Not quite sure on this one. It looks very close to C. maculiceps in terms of markings and wing venation. But the wings are cloudy and it just seems too small.
Found one in Oct.
Dorsal
Profile
Wing Venation
Face Markings + Antennae
Bark Lice
Psocodea
Bark Louse
Psocidae
Bark Louse
Trichadenotecnum enderleini


iNaturalist
Na
e m
1st Live Photo's on-line: At only 2.5mm body & head length, it wasn't the easiest animal we've tried to photograph
It's seems to be a relatively common species but isn't described in Smithers (1990) that we can see. However, it matches very closely Ptycta enderleini, in the paper "Systematic Position of Trichadenotecnum enderleini" by Yoshizawa & Smithers. We use the ALA for naming, which still uses the old name; Trichadenotecnum enderleini, not Ptycta enderleini as described in the above paper.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Thrips
Thysanoptera
Thrips
Phlaeothripidae
Giant Thrips
Idolothrips spectrum


iNaturalist
Na
a
This is a bit of a scientific joke we think. "Giant" as in much bigger than others, but still tiny.
Head & Antennae
Ovipositor (hairy end)
Body, dorsal
Thrips
Thysanoptera
Thrips
Phlaeothripidae
Thrips
Phlaeothripidae sp
Na
e m a
A strange note on the English language - it seems it's one thrips or two thrips, not one thrip.
Dorsal
Profile
Caddisfies
Trichoptera
Caddisfly
Hydropsychidae
Caddisfly
Cheumatopsyche sp
Na
e m
Body & head are only about 4mm.
Often surprises us we find water born insects on Ellura given we don't have any standing water & it's semi-arid. But they keep turning up, to our wonder & enjoyment
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Silverfishes
Zygentoma
Silverfish
Lepismatidae
Striped Silverfish
Lepismatidae sp ES01
Na
e m
 
Silverfishes
Zygentoma
Silverfish
Lepismatidae
Silverfish
Lepismatidae sp ES02
Na
e m
 
Dorsal
Ventral (Silvery)
Silverfishes
Zygentoma
Silverfish
Lepismatidae
Silverfish
Lepismatidae sp ES03
Na
e m
 
Silverfishes
Zygentoma
Silverfish
Lepismatidae
Orange Spotted Silverfish
Lepismatidae sp ES04


iNaturalist
Na
e m
 
🔍

Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Crustaceans (Malacostraca)
Crustaceans
Amphipoda
Landhoppers
Talitridae
Terrestrial Amphipod
Talitridae sp


iNaturalist
Na
a
Other Common NamesLandhoppers or Landshrimps

~6mm long. Found in the front lawn of our place in Lobethal, in January on the shady side of a large tree. There's one here with different coloured antennae & legs to the others. They were all collected at the same time in the same location. This variation is possibly due to different species/gender/age.

Thomas Mesaglio said "They need moisture/water to prevent drying out, but will drown with too much water. I think there are a few different genera/species as you'd expect, but the most common one in Australia is Arcitalitrus sylvaticus, which has also been introduced to the US, UK, NZ, etc".

Chris Lambkin said "Yes we get lots of these on occassions when pan trapping as Thomas described. Even get them in Malaise Traps in moist environments. Interestingly when they die they turn orange, especially in alcohol!"

Ian Gibbins said "Amphipods are terrestrial crustaceans. They are probably related to another group of terrestrial crustaceans, the Isopods, which include slaters and so-called pill bugs". "They are not especially closely related to true shrimps, prawns, etc. Amphipods are common in our garden in Belair - turn over a long standing pot or old brick, and they will spring out."
Dorsal
Profile
Legs
Ventral
Peracarid Crustaceans
Isopoda
Terrestrial Crustacean
Armadillidae
Grey Slater
Armadillidae sp


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Grant Schiermeyer for identifying this species for us

Those we have found vary between 10 to 16 mm long. We've photographed 4 live specimens in March, April, June & July. We found the 5th, dead, specimen to highlight the hour-glass shape
We thought this was a Pill Bug (Armadillidium vulgare).
It's difficult to see here but the Telson (last posterior plate) has an hour-glass shape.
Grant spotted our mistake and also noted: "You can tell the families apart by the telson and the front of the head.
Armadillids will have an hourglass telson and Armadillidiids have a triangular or trapezoidal telson.
The front of an Armadillid head is usually one smooth line that may be broken in the center while an Armadillidiid will have a nose-like projection in the middle of the head."
S1: dorsal
S1: Eyes + pill shape
S5: Telson hour-glass shape
S1: Face
S1: ventral
Peracarid Crustaceans
Isopoda
Terrestrial Crustacean
Armadillidiidae
Pill Bug
Armadillidium vulgare


iNaturalist
If
a
Other Common NamesPill-bug, Pillbug, Roly-poly, Slater or Woodlouse

Thank you Grant Schiermeyer for confirming the id of this species for us

Interestingly, Atlas only has 2 species described in this family and they are both introduced.
Notice the trapezoidal telson of this family mentioned by Grant above.
We think the colour variation is due to the specimen #4 recently moulting. Specimen #7 is the colour of an older specimen.
S7: dorsal
S4: dorsal
S7: profile
S4: pill
S4: ventral
Peracarid Crustaceans
Isopoda
Terrestrial Crustacean
Philosciidae
Slater
Laevophiloscia yalgoonensis


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Other Common NameWoodlouse
 
Peracarid Crustaceans
Isopoda
Terrestrial Crustacean
Porcellionidae
Common Rough Woodlouse
Porcellio scaber


iNaturalist
If
e m
~10mm long
🔍Dorsal
🔍Profile
Anterior
🔍Ventral

Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Ostracods (Ostracoda)
Ostracods
Ostracoda
Ostracods
Ostracoda
Ostracod
Ostracoda sp
Na
m
 

Animals (Animalia) - Molluscs (Mollusca) - Gastropods, Slugs, And Snails (Gastropoda)
Land Snails & Slugs
Stylommatophora
Typical Snail
Helicidae
Garden Snail
Cornu aspersum
If
e m a
The shell was ~28mm long & ~23mm high. 4 eye stalks. They don't seem to have an obvious umbilicus (centre hole).
They are very variable in colour & pattern making id difficult.
Dorsal
Profile
Eyes
Ventral, retracted
Ventral, "foot"
Land Snails & Slugs
Stylommatophora
Small Land Snail
Hygromiidae
Common White Snail
Cernuella virgata


iNaturalist
If
e m
Other Common NamesCommon Garden Snail, Maritime Gardensnail or Vineyard snail

These are easily confused with another introduced snail, the White Italian Snail (Theba pisana). The centre hole is covered, or nearly covered, with T. pisana. So a photo of the umbilicus is requred for definate identification. It was how we were able to id these specimens.
Matt Parr from iNaturalist says that T. pisana has a flatter top/spire and more inflated shell than Cernuella virgata. Thanks Matt
Hole
Shell ~6mm diameter
Dead, hole
Dead

Animals (Animalia) - Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) - Free-living Flatworms (Rhabditophora)
Planarians
Tricladida
Flatworm
Geoplanidae
Adelaide's Planarian
Artioposthia adelaidensis


iNaturalist
Na
a
Other Common NamesPretty Land Planarian or Flatworm

Thank you Dr Leigh Winsor for identifying this species for us
 

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