Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach, SA, 5354
                      
 
Stat'NotesThumbnails: 640.   85 native species listed, with 48 from Ellura
Plants (Plantae) - Shrubs & Bushes
Carrots
Apiales
Pittosporum
Pittosporaceae
Sweet Bursaria
Bursaria spinosa ssp spinosa
LC
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Other Common NamesChristmas bush or Native Blackthorn

It'd be very easy to confuse this with Box thorn. The flowers are quite different, but unfortunately we don't have any photo's of them yet. It's spring, so hopefully won't be long
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Bluebush Daisy
Cratystylis conocephala


iNaturalist
LC
emr
Other Common NamesBluebush or Blue-bush Daisy

Similar Species: Pearl Bluebush (Maireana sedifolia)
From a distance, very easy to confuse with Pearl Bluebush in shape and colour (hence the name we suspect). Up close it's easy to spot the difference.
Generally larger than the Pearl Bluebush in our area.
Whole
Structure
Structure
Leaf
Leaves
Buds
Bud
Flower going to Seed
Flower tube Drying, about to Seed
Flower tube Splitting, as it Seeds
Seed Dispersing
Several Seeds Fell together
Single Seed, with Ant
Single Seed, End
Barbs on Seed Bristles
Compared to Pearl Bluebush
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Short-leaf Daisy-bush
Olearia brachyphylla
LC
em
Small white flower with 8 petals. Buds are green & white with red highlights.
Leaves are very small and felted underneath.
Stems are soft and pale green when new, hardening to grey wood with age.
A low dense bush, which blends into the background until it flowers, when it stands out like a beacon.
In Flower
In Seed
Structure in Bud
About to Explode into Flower
Hairy/Felted Back of Leaf
New Bud showing Felt
Bud
Bud about to open
New Flower Centre
New Flower
Compared to O. pimeleoides
Seed Pods
Seed Pod
Seed in Pod
After Seeding
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Crinkle-leaf Daisy-bush
Olearia calcarea


iNaturalist
RA
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Other Common NameLimestone Daisy-bush

Marie really out-did herself to find this one. She has amazing pattern recognition abilities.
We walked past a couple of these bushes and she asked what they were. I said "O. muelleri". She said "No, it's different". I took a slightly closer look and said "Oh, O. magniflora". "No, it's not that either."
I then took a really long look and said "I have no idea; you've done it again. How do you do that ?" Of course as soon as she asked what it was I instinctively knew something was up, 'cause she knows O. muelleri & O. magniflora like the back of her hand.
It is said that O. calcarea is a natural cross between O. muelleri & O. magniflora. And we can certainly see why.
The two specimens we've found on Ellura have quite different buds. One has large green buds, the other small copper highlighted buds. But the rest of the bush looks the same. One suspects one being in a small clearing on it's own, and the other at the base of a small mallee tree is the reason.
Whole
Structure
Structure, close
Leaves, ~12mm long
S1: Large Bud, ~13mm high
S2: Small Red Bud
O. muelleri (left) comparison
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Splendid Daisy-bush
Olearia magniflora


iNaturalist
NT
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Usually this bush likes to live with in the safety of another bush
When on its own it's a very straggly looking affair.
Beautiful large pale purple flowers
Leaves are stiff and like shovels, with up to 4 small prongs coming out the side.
On it's own
In another
Leaf
Buds
Bud Opening
New Flower
Old Flower (long stamen)
Seeded - In Seed
Blooming
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Mueller's Daisy-bush
Olearia muelleri


iNaturalist
LC
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Other Common NameGoldfield's Daisy

Small, round, green, succulent leaves. Small white flowers, yellow centres.
A dense bush with stems that go from stiff green to grey wood with age.
Bush in Flower
Bush after Seeding
Structure
Leaves & Buds Opening
Leaves, Bud & New Flower
Leaves, Bud & Flower
Leaves & Old Flower
Husk - Seeding - In Seed
Husk after Rain
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Pimelea Daisy-bush
Olearia pimeleoides ssp pimeleoides


iNaturalist
LC
emr
Other Common NameShowy Daisy-bush
 
Structure
Leaves
Compared to O.+brachyphylla
Daisies
Asterales
Daisy
Asteraceae
Azure Daisy-bush
Olearia rudis


iNaturalist
RA
m
Thank you Darren Schmitke for identifying this species for us
 
🔍Habitat
🔍Habit
🔍Leaves & Stems
Leaves
🔍Flower
🔍Calyx
Budding, Flowering & Seeding
Daisies
Asterales
Goodenia
Goodeniaceae
Grooved Dampiera
Dampiera lanceolata var lanceolata


iNaturalist
LC
m
Thank you to Darren Schmitke for showing us this amazing area of fire recovery. A bush fire destroyed this area 2.5 years before. He's never seen Dampiera thrive like this, in decades of experience exploring local reserves.
In one day these three species were all seen in flower together.
These were considerably larger and more lanky than the other two Dampiera's we saw on the day.
🔍Field
🔍Patch
Single Bush
🔍Habit
🔍Bud
🔍Pale Flower
🔍Variegated Flower
🔍"Plain" Flower Front
🔍Flower Profile
Daisies
Asterales
Goodenia
Goodeniaceae
Velvet Dampiera
Dampiera marifolia


iNaturalist
NT
m
Similar to Grooved Dampiera in they are covered in felt, but these are a much more compact species.
🔍Habitat
🔍Habit
🔍Flower
Daisies
Asterales
Goodenia
Goodeniaceae
Native Rosemary
Dampiera rosmarinifolia


iNaturalist
LC
m
Thank you Alan Dandie for confirming the id of this species for us

These are relatively easy to separate from the other two dampiera we saw on the day. They have long relatively thin glossy leaves.
Patch
Sea of Purple
Single Bush
🔍Habit
Daisies
Asterales
Goodenia
Goodeniaceae
Spiny Fan-flower
Scaevola spinescens


iNaturalist
LC
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Other Common NameCurrant Bush

An unattractive bush with light grey foliage and stems.
Very stiff with spikes coming from the stems.
Bush
Structure, Leaves, Flowers & buds
Flowering Bush
Bud
Bud Showing Split Lines
Bud Splitting / Opening
Bud Opening
Bud Opening
Flower
🔍Flower
Flower
Flowers
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Pointed Saltbush
Atriplex acutibractea ssp acutibractea


iNaturalist
LC
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🔍Habit
Habit
New Leaves
Leaves & Bud
🔍Fruit, serveral
🔍Fruit, profile
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Kidney Saltbush
Atriplex stipitata


iNaturalist
LC
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Other Common NamesMallee Saltbush or Bitter Saltbush

Previously we considered these to have swollen fruits, which didn't make much sense.
But of course we now realise they are galls.
Bush
Structure
Structure
Leaves
Leaves & Fruit
Bud showing stamen
Flower opening
Flower open
Male Flowers
Galls & Flat Fruits
Gall
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Cottony Saltbush
Chenopodium curvispicatum


iNaturalist
LC
emr
SynonymRhagodia gaudichaudiana

Other Common NamesCottony Goosefoot or White Goosefoot

Generally a structural parasite than uses other bushes for shade and to allow it's stems to reach much higher. As such, often seen as a vine. However, it can survive on it's own; but tends to be lower to the ground and more prostrate in this situation. Over a metre tall inside another bush, or ankle height on it's own. It's possible the low height is due to grazing, where those in another bush are more protected.
Green to silvery grey leaves which are triangular and shovel shaped.
The soft parts of the plant (leaves, flowers, etc; non-woody) are covered in vesicular hairs (hairs ending with a sack/bladder). It's possible these sacks are filled with moisture when young and dry out, we're not sure. We always thought they were salt crystals. Some look like tiny inverted mushrooms; possibly once/if they've dried.
Primarily female flowers with some bi-sexual flowers on the same bush (ie polygamo-monoecious), which are petalless.
While the fruit can be yellow or red, we see predominantly Red Fruit, with Red Tepals.
The fruit is encapsulated within 5 tepals that open to reveal the fruit. As it matures and opens it looks like a red flower with 5 petals.These tepals can look as though they are stained by the fruit on the inside, but can be red, green or yellow regardless of the fruit colour.
Occasional fruits can appear shrivelled and dried up; we assume this is caused by Hemiptera (True bugs) attack.
The green colouring of the macro shots of the leaves is different to how we see them in the field. This is because the underlying colour of the leaves is green, but the vesicular hairs are translucent and reflective giving the leaves a grey look. An optical illusion really.
🔍Big On Dead Callitris Trunk
🔍On Top of Beyeria Bush
🔍In Exocarpos
🔍Structural Parasite
🔍Big Bush Fruiting
🔍Yellow-fruiting Bush
🔍Red-fruiting Bush
🔍Tall Bush
🔍Leaf Budding
🔍Leaf Shape
🔍Vesicular hairs on Leaf
🔍Immature Bisexual Flower
🔍Mature Bisexual Flower
🔍Stigma of Bisexual Flower
🔍Female Flowers
🔍Bunch of Fruit
🔍Fruiting Stem
🔍Red Fruit, Green Tepals
🔍Red Fruit, Green Tepals
🔍Red Fruit, Pale Tepals
🔍Yellow Fruit, Red Tepals
🔍Yellow Fruit, Pale Tepals
🔍Shrivelled Fruit
🔍Fruit Dispersed, Red Tepals
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Ruby Saltbush
Enchylaena tomentosa var tomentosa
LC
emr
Other Common NameBarrier Saltbush

A soft, pretty little bush with bright, shiny, ruby red to yellow fruits (on the same bush). Young fruit is green.
We're pretty sure that the old fruits can also be green (as per photo here). Others suggest all fruit goes red with time, but we don't agree with this; with our specimens. It's always possible there are unknown subspecies with different behaviours.
Leaves can be pale green (almost white) thru dark green with dark red tips, cylindrical and succulent.
Stem is generally grey and woody.
Can have a spreading or upright habit, often entwined in another bush.
Whole
Upright Habit
Spreading Habit
Pale, Felted Leaf
New Fruit & Reddish Leaves
Lots of Fruit & Green Leaves
Orange Fruit
Mature Ruby Red Fruit
Mature Yellow Fruit
Mature Green Fruit
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Leafless Bluebush
Maireana aphylla


iNaturalist
VU
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Other Common NameCottonbush

A very spiny large bluebush. With the drought, this specimen is very stressed; looks much more spiny than normal. Even so, it's covered in thousands of flowers!
Petalless flowers, with hot pink stigma.
We could find any fruits, even old ones.
While it seems leafless, you can notice in the bottom left of the last photo there are very small leaves. Unlike Spinebush (Acacia) the spines are not phyllodes, but proper stems. The leaves are small, but succulent.
🔍Whole
🔍Habit
🔍Leaves & Flowers
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Short-leaf Bluebush
Maireana brevifolia


iNaturalist
LC
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SynonymsKochia brevifolia, Enchylaena tamariscina or Kochia tamariscina

Other Common NamesCottonbush, Small Leaf Bluebush or Yanga Bush

On the whole a very straggly plant.
But the prominent green heads / tops, with red branches are quite pretty.
Flowers are almost invisible. Like most Maireana's; the fruit looks more like a flower and is quite beautiful.
The new fruits have a beautiful red edge to the wings.
Supported by a log
Structure / Green Head
New Branch Forming
Leaves & Stem
Buds, Flowers & Leaves
Flowers turning to Fruit
Mass of Fruit
3 Fruits; Dried, Mature, New
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Rosy Bluebush
Maireana erioclada


iNaturalist
LC
em
Deep pink/red fruits which are flat with a tiny back centre, that becomes fury/woolly/wooly as it matures. The black centre is actually the dried remnants of the flower. The fruit appear flat with one horizontal "wing"; but in outline are cup shaped (when taking the rear vertical wings into account).
The fruits are diagnostic, as they are with all the bluebush; they have a single slit in the "wing" which is very hard to spot. The 5 fins (vertical wings) at the back, supporting the horizontal wing (at the front) are more obvious.
The leaves are alternating, glabrous (smooth & hairless), succulent and cylindrical (obovoid to clavate) with a tiny soft point at the tip. The size of the leaves, as well as quantity, relates directly to how wet or dry it has been.
As the leaves age, they turn from solid green to pink/red tips.
They turn black & shrivel over summer as the plant extracts moisture to survive; leaving a grey shell until the winter rains come.
Stems are covered in white fury/wool
Yyoung fruit
~300mm high
Whole
🔍Whole
End of Fruiting
Habit
Habit
Habit
Leaves
🔍Leaves
Leaves, red tips
Leaves, drying
🔍Flowers, new
Flowers, ~2mm wide
🔍Flowers
Pollen
Flowers dying & new fruit
Young fruit
🔍Fruit, profile
🔍Fruit, anterior, ~10mm wide
Fruit, highlighting vertical wings
Fruit, slit
Fruit, dried
Lot a fruit
Mass of fruit
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Erect Mallee Bluebush
Maireana pentatropis


iNaturalist
LC
emr
Small, cylindrical, succulent, green leaves on long woody buff stems. Flowers are tiny white at the base of the leaves on the stem.
In summer the plant takes nutrients from the leaves, leaving the leaves to shrivel up into black husk.
Several Plants
New Stem, Leaves & Flowers
Summer Dried Leaves
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Radiate Bluebush
Maireana radiata


iNaturalist
LC
emr
SynonymKochia radiata

Other Common NameGrey Bluebush
 
Whole
Whole
Structure
Woolly Bud, Leaves & Stem
Leaves Drying
Dried Leaves
Flowers Male•Female
Flowers
Flowering & Fruiting
🔍Fruit Stem
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Rohrlach's Bluebush
Maireana rohrlachii


iNaturalist
LC
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Probably one of the most beautiful bluebush fruits. The fruit wings are curved and have deep red edges, going to shiny copper centres.
The wing is one piece with a single slit, which is hard to spot.
The centre fleshy part of the fruit is green and cone shaped on the back.
The stems are hairy, and leaves typical of Maireana; succulent green with red tinges.
We confused these for a while with M brevifolia, as they can have a bit of a red ring. But closer inspection shows the single wing vs 5 for M brevifolia. The plant is similar though (well that's my excuse & I'm sticking to it
without the red stems.
Whole
Small
Structure
Leaves
Flowers in Bloom
Flowers going to fruit
Fruit, new
Fruit, back
Fruit, transluscent wing
Fruit, slit in wing
Fruit, lots
🔍Fruit, lots, paler
Fruit, profile, ~12mm high
Fruit, just beautiful
Fruit, beautiful 1 day perfect the next
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Pearl Bluebush
Maireana sedifolia


iNaturalist
LC
emr
Other Common NamesDense Bluebush or Bluebush

Similar Species: Bluebush Daisy (Cratystylis conocephala)
These are very easy to spot.
They are very bright at certain times of year and almost glow. Like the old silver Xmas trees.
Medium sized bushes with cylindrical grey/silver leaves.
From a distance, very easy to confuse with Bluebush Daisy in shape and colour. Up close it's easy to spot the difference.
Generally smaller than the Bluebush Daisy in our area.
Leaves are very felted / covered in silky fibres (which is shiny).
Not the different gender flowers, and the size of the fruit, compared to the leaves, in the different aged fruits here. The fruit grows behind the red female flower. When the flower germinates the fruit then grows, with the flower turning brown in the centre as it dies.
They are known not to flower for a decade. We still haven't seen ours flower or fruit in 8 years.
Striking Colour
Beaming
Plain
🔍A Sea of Pearl
Structure
Leaves
Old Male Flowers
Old Male Flowers
🔍Female Flowers + Fruit Forming
🔍Fruit in Profile
🔍Fruit, with Centre Flower Drying
🔍Fruits
🔍Mature Fruit
Compared to Bluebush Daisy
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Fleshy Saltbush
Rhagodia crassifolia


iNaturalist
LC
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As with other saltbushes, the fruit of these is a bright red berry.
Unlike E. tomentosa we believe the green fruit is young, ripening to red.
Whole
Structure
New & Ripe Fruit
Fruit
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Mealy Saltbush
Rhagodia parabolica
LC
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Other Common NamesFragrant Saltbush or Oldman Saltbush
 
Medium
Small
Young Structure
Old Structure
New Growth
Typical Leaf
Female Flowers
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Mallee Saltbush
Rhagodia preissii ssp preissii


iNaturalist
LC
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Unlike the usual grey of saltbush, this species is very green. Without the buds it'd be hard to recognise as a saltbush at all.
🔍Habit
🔍Structure
🔍Buds & Flowers
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Spiny Saltbush
Rhagodia spinescens
LC
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Other Common NamesBerry saltbush, Creeping Saltbush, Hedge saltbush or Thorny saltbush

Compared to other Spiny shrubs, this is pretty soft and painless.
Has great variety of leaf colour from pale green thru to vivid red (we suspect the red ones are dying, like autumn leaves). Older leaves are green with a white milky coating and shiny reddish brown edges (margins). These leaves are very distinctive to this species making id easy, but aren't on young plants.
As with all saltbushes, has tiny flowers that are barely discernible.
The fruits are much darker than usual; a deep burgundy wine colour. As such, any red fruits you see with the naked eye are not fruits but the stained bracts remaining after the fruit has dropped.
Seedling
Young Plant
Small
Small
Medium
Large
Mature Plant Re-sprouting
Habit
Structure
Structure
Spine
Salty, Triangular, Green Leaf
Shiny, Brown Edged Leaf
Salty, Pointy, Green Leaves
Salty, Round, Green Leaves
Red Leaf
Bud Opening
Flower Perspective
Female Flower
New Male Flower
Male Flower
Female Flower Stem
Fruit Starting
Fruit Forming
Fruit, Well Hidden
Fruit Dispersed
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Goosefoot
Chenopodiaceae
Intricate Saltbush
Rhagodia ulicina


iNaturalist
LC
mr
Other Common NamesSpiny Goosefoot or Spiny Saltbush

Small leaves, ~2-5mm. A medium sized, grey-green shrub with many branching stems
Young stems are red.
In winter/spring the leaves hide the branches quite well but as the season dries some of the leaves fall off leaving a spiny looking habit.
The overal shape of the bush seems quite variable, possibly due to grazing from herbivours.
This is a dioecious species, ie a specimen is either male or female. Only the female plants produce fruit.
Like other Rhagodia's, the fruit is a red berry.
🔍Whole, in Flower
🔍Whole, grazed
🔍Whole, more erect
🔍Whole, low
🔍New stem & Leaves
🔍Spiny Habit
🔍Female Flowers
Betalains
Caryophyllales
Knotweed
Polygonaceae
Twiggy Lignum
Muehlenbeckia diclina


iNaturalist
VU
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SynonymMuehlenbeckia diclina ssp diclina

Other Common NameWeeping Lignum

There seems to be a change in that the sub-species isn't recognised any more, with some movement of Muehlenbeckia genus to Duma.
Flowering
🔍Habit & Size
🔍Leaves
🔍Bud Opening
Full Bloom
DillenialesDillenia
Dilleniaceae
Long-hair Guinea-flower
Hibbertia crinita


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Robert Lawrence for identifying this species for us
 
🔍Budding
DillenialesDillenia
Dilleniaceae
Prickly Guinea-flower
Hibbertia exutiacies
Na
a
Other Common NameSpiky Guinea-flower

These little bushes are a ray of sunshine in spring
The flowers drop their petals very easily, leaving discussion and quandry in their wake as one tries to work out this new green flowering plant
LOL
The yellow flowers are about 15mm wide, with the pale green buds at just over 2mm.
The flowers can vary in general appearance with the 5 petals being close together forming a buttercup flower appearance, or spread apart looking like a star.
Counting the petals isn't easy with petals often overlapping, yet each one having an indent in the end making it appear to be 2 petals close together.
The green, nearly cylindrical leaves have a sharp spike on the end (hence prickly) and are about 8mm long. They are adjacent, often in swirls of 5 leaves (ie about 70 deg apart), with fine teeth along the edge.
In flower
Habit
New Leaves
Buds
Bud Opening
New Flower, lost all petals
Flowers, with & without petals
Flower, lost 1 petal
New Flower, profile
Flower, spread petals
Mature Flower, profile
DillenialesDillenia
Dilleniaceae
Silky Guinea-flower
Hibbertia sericea
LC
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Photograph yet to be loaded.
DillenialesDillenia
Dilleniaceae
Guinea Flower
Hibbertia sp


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Ralph Foster for identifying this species for us

We thought this was Australian Buttercup (Ranunculus lappaceus)
🔍Flower
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Wreath Wattle
Acacia acinacea
VU
ma
SynonymAcacia rotundifolia

Other Common NamesGold-dust Wattle or Round-leaved Wattle
 
🔍Whole
Leaves
Buds
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Silver Mulga-bush
Acacia argyrophylla
LC
m
Thank you Andrew Allanson for identifying this species for us
 
Whole
Leaves
Seed Pod
Seed
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Veined Wait-a-while
Acacia colletioides


iNaturalist
LC
r
Similar Species: Spine Bush (Acacia nyssophylla)
The leaves (phyllodes) have 8 parallel veins (nerves).
Sorry about the yellow colour of the close ups, they were taken in drought, not a diagnostic of the species.
While they are classed as Least Concern we've only ever seen them once. They are nearly impossible to separate from Spinebush from a distance, so you need to take a close look at the phyllodes of everyone you see. We've done this with all our Spinebushes on Ellura and not a colletioides to be found.
The name comes from a local legend that if you ever fell into one you'll have to wait-a-while for someone else to pull you out. They are so prickly that trying to push yourself off the bush would be extremely painful!
🔍Whole
🔍Structure
🔍Leaf
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Hakea Wattle
Acacia hakeoides
LC
em
Thank you Andrew Allanson for helping with the id of this species for us

We have quite a few examples were multiple bushes look like one huge bush.
Bright yellow, petal-less, ball flowers with long, oval, green leaves. The leaves are wide with a round tip and often have a thin yellow edge.
Stems are yellow when young going through green, brown then to grey wood with age.
Seeds are grown in pods. Unlike most pods these are very shaped, around each seed. When the pod splits open the black seeds can be seen, and are held in by stalks until ready to disperse.
Bush in Flower
Several Bushes in Flower
Bushes under Mallee
Bush with Dried Pods
Structure & Leaves
Early Bud
Buds
Bud, Leaf & Flower
Flower, with mating Weevils
Green Pods
Dried Pods
Seed with Stalk
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Sandhill Wattle
Acacia ligulata
LC
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Other Common NamesDune Wattle, Small Cooba, Umbrella or Wardaruka Bush

Thank you Andrew Allanson for identifying this species for us

Peter Marriott kindly sent us a paper from 1953 of the proceedings of the Royal Society of South Australia. From page 56, it discusses how the roots of this shub are a food source for Witjuti / Witchety / Witchetty grubs; named after the Witjuti bush which is now considered to be Acacia kempeana. Various tribes had various names for the bushes, one being Wardaruka Bush for this species, and so Wardaruka grubs would feed on it's roots. Interesting how one term is so well known & the other not
Whole
Leaves & Stem
Leaf tip variation
Dried Seed Pods
Seed Perspective
Seed & Orange Aril
Seed & Yellow Aril
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Spine Bush
Acacia nyssophylla


iNaturalist
LC
emr
Other Common NamesPin Bush or Spinebush

Similar Species: Veined Wait-a-while (Acacia colletioides)
Very similar to Wait-a-while, A. colletioides, except the leaves (phyllodes) have 16 parallel veins (nerves), not 8.
Yellow flowers don't have petals, but are spherical/ball-shaped.
Seeds come in long, flat pods a bit like beans.
Flowers are not in receme's but on peduncles, usually 2 per leaf axis.
🔍Large Bush
🔍Large Bush
🔍Same Large Bush in Flower
🔍Medium Bush in Flower, Not Grazed
🔍Small Bush in Flower, Grazed
🔍New Stem & Leaves
🔍Phylloids, Peduncle, Flowers, Buds
🔍Buds & Leaves
🔍Close up on Buds & Leaves
🔍Flowers & Phyllodes
🔍Old Bush, Finishing Flowering
🔍New Seed Pod Forming
🔍Seed Pods Growing
🔍Hairy Green Young Seed Pods
🔍Seed & Aril
🔍Dried Seed & Pods
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Umbrella Wattle
Acacia oswaldii
LC
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Other Common NameOswald's Wattle

Thank you Andrew Allanson for identifying this species for us
 
Leaves
🔍Flower
Flower Stem
Pods
Pod
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Needlebush Wattle
Acacia rigens


iNaturalist
LC
m
Other Common NameNealie
 
🔍Habit
🔍Leaves & Buds
🔍Flowers
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Hard-leaf Wattle
Acacia sclerophylla var sclerophylla


iNaturalist
LC
em
Similar to A. hakeoides, but the leaves are much narrower, with a pointy tip. At the tip, the leaf dries to a hard black/grey point. Leaves don't have the yellow edge, but are strongly veined / striped.
Generally the bushes are shorter and more sprawling than the Hakea Wattle.
When in flower the bush looks like a mass of upright flower stems, whereas the Hakea tends to look like a big, wide, yellow ball.
The seeds are held in the pods with a white cup. There is no cup holding the seed in the Hakea Wattle.
Bush
Masses of New Buds
New Buds, Above
New Buds, Profile
New Buds Breaking Out
New Buds on Stalks
Bud, Leaves & Flowers
Green Pods & Leaves
Dried Pods & Seeds
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Wilhelm's Wattle
Acacia wilhelmiana


iNaturalist
LC
m
Other Common NameDwarf Nealie
 
🔍Habit
🔍Structure
🔍Leaves
🔍Buds
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Narrow-leaf Bitter-pea
Daviesia leptophylla


iNaturalist
Na
a
Thank you Robert Lawrence for identifying this species for us
 
🔍Leaves
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Mallee Bush-pea
Eutaxia microphylla var microphylla
LC
em
Other Common NameCommon Eutaxia

Stiff structure, where the small green leaves seem to completely wrap the young stems, however, the stems are the same colour as the leaves. So they don't completely wrap it.
Bright yellow pea-like flowers.
Buds are deep red / brown.
Whole
Structure
Lots of Buds
🔍Bunch of Flowers
Flower
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Large-leaf Bush-pea
Pultenaea daphnoides
Na
a
A tall (up to 2m) spindly bush, with wedge shaped leaves; note the pointed "tip" on the leaves
Whole
Early Buds
Leaves
Buds & Young Flowers
Flower Laden
Young Flowers
Older Flowers
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Silver Cassia
Senna artemisioides ssp artemisioides


iNaturalist
DD
em
Other Common NamePunty Bush

Very similar to the Senna artemisioides ssp filifolia, but the leaves are not cylindrical; even though they look it from one side. They are heavily curved, like a new moon in cross section. The photo's tell the story easier than it is to describe them.
The leaves are also shorter, which reduces the spiky appearance.
Oops, forgot to mention; they also regularly have 4 leaflets (or more), not the 2 of filifolia.
They are very common on Ellura, with an estimated 30% of Senna artemisioides bushes being this sub-species.
Bush
Structure
Leaf
New Flowers
Old Flowers
Green Pod
Drying Pods
Dried Pod
🔍Comparison S a filifolia & petiolaris
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Broad-leaf Desert Senna
Senna artemisioides ssp coriacea


iNaturalist
LC
em
All our Senna's start growing the pods from the centre of the flower as soon as the flower opens. It's a thin green bent stalk in the middle. As the flower is pollinated and so dies and falls off around the stem, the pod continues to grow.
Seedling
Bush
🔍Structure
Flower & New Pod
🔍Comparison S a zygophylla
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Fine-leaf Desert Senna
Senna artemisioides ssp filifolia


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NameSilver Cassia

Bright yellow flowers with 5 petals.
Leaves are light green and very long, thin and cylindrical which split in two half way along (into leaflets). Look more like new stems than leaves.
Overall the bush looks spiky on top. Very easy to confuse with s.a. ssp zygophylla as they both seem to have narrow leaves. But closer inspection reveals the filifolia having cylindrical leaves, whereas the zygophylla has very curved end leaflets.
Bright green flat pods (similar to beans) dry on the bush to a dark rusty brown and are crispy.
Also very similar to ssp petiolaris. As ssp filifolia leaves age, the base of the leaf flattens out, so is not totally cylindrical as it is when young. But notice it is still divided in the middle (ie half and half).
Bushes starting to Flower
Bush in Flower
Bushes with Pods
Structure with New Buds & Leaves
Showing Spiky Appearance
Buds nearly Open
🔍New Flower
Old Flower
Green Pods, Flowers & Leaves
Dried Pod showing Seed
Seeds in Pod
🔍Compare S a artemisioides & petiolaris
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Woody Desert Senna
Senna artemisioides ssp petiolaris


iNaturalist
LC
emr
Other Common NamesFlat-stalk Senna or Woody Cassia

Similar to ssp filifolia, but the base of the leaf is always flattened, not cylindrical, even in the young leaves.
The leaf base is thicker (compared to length) than old filifolia leaves.
The leaf splits into leaflets about 2/3rds the way along, not 1/2 way (as in filifolia).
ssp petiolaris leaflets tend to curve over more on the ends compared with ssp filifolia leaflets.
All these tendencies mean that you could get a leaf off a ssp filifolia bush that matches a ssp petiolaris. But you won't see a petiolaris leaf that has a cylindrical base.
All Senna artemisioides can loose the end leaflets.
Whole
Perspective
Leaf
2 Leaf bases (no leaflets), not a leaf
🔍Comparison S a filifolia & artemisioides
FabalesLegume
Fabaceae or Leguminosae
Twin-leaf Desert Senna
Senna artemisioides ssp zygophylla


iNaturalist
RA
em
Other Common NamesDesert Senna or Grey Cassia

Very similar to the other S. artemisioides.
Most closely similar to ssp coriacea. Notice however the leaflets are narrower and more pointed.
The name is a bit of a misnomer as well. There are usually 4-6 leaflets, not two.
They are classed as rare, but are not listed in the Murraylands Survey. We have lost the specimens (not recognising what they were at the time), so are on the look out for it to take better measurements.
Whole
Leaves
🔍Leaf
Leaf
🔍Comparison S a coriacea
LamialesForget-me-not
Boraginaceae
Smooth Blue-flower
Halgania andromedifolia


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NameScented Blue-flower

Smallish, stiff, shiny, green leaves. Pale green / white felted underneath.
Blossoms with a blue / pale-purple flower with 5 petals.
Leaves superficially resemble Beyeria lechenaultii leaves, but Halgania leaves are much larger and are pointy.
Bush
Leaves
Bud & Leaf
Flower with Raindrops
Sepals
🔍Bunch of Flowers
LamialesForget-me-not
Boraginaceae
Rough Blue-flower
Halgania cyanea


iNaturalist
LC
m
 
🔍Whole
Structure
Flower
LamialesMint
Lamiaceae
Scarlet Mintbush
Prostanthera aspalathoides


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NamePixie Caps

Has an Eremophila style red flower, which is speckled under macro photography.
Buds are like a Spanish soldiers helmet.
Leaves are like a Maireana's, green, succulent and cylindrical (also speckled).
Generally a dense bush.
Whole
Whole
Bud, Flower & Leaf
Flower & Leaf
LamialesMint
Lamiaceae
Green Mintbush
Prostanthera chlorantha


iNaturalist
Na
a
The flower cups are variable from plain lime green to green with red stripes.
Flower is lilac to white. Stems are covered in white, complex hair.
🔍Whole
🔍Stems
🔍Leaves
🔍Flower & Bud
🔍Under Flower
LamialesMint
Lamiaceae
Stiff Western Rosemary
Westringia rigida


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NameStiff Westringia

A very stiff plant. The plants overall bell shape makes it look as though there's big pot in the middle with a creeper that's overflowed.
Flowers are small and delicate with 5 hairy petals arranged in an orchid shape. The flower's "tongue" is speckled with tiny red blotches.
We have another variety which has a different habit. It's sparse and generally looks greener. Flowers are the same, as are the individual stems. We thought they were seedlings at first, but there are other young plants that look like bonsai versions of the large ones. So we are not sure why some are different. The sparse ones are generally smaller.
Seedling
Whole
Summer Red Colour
Sparse Variety
Structure
Flower
New Growth
LamialesPlantain
Plantaginaceae
Bluerod
Stemodia florulenta
LC
mr
SynonymMorgania floribunda
 
Whole
🔍Structure
Leaf & Stem
Flower
LamialesFigwort
Scrophulariaceae
Narrow-leaf Emubush
Eremophila alternifolia
RA
m
Other Common NamesNarrow-leaf Fucia Bush, Native Honeysuckle or Poverty Bush
 
Flower
🔍Flower & Leaf
LamialesFigwort
Scrophulariaceae
Turkey-bush
Eremophila deserti
RA
m
SynonymMyoporum deserti

Other Common NamesCarrot Bush, Dogwood, Pencil Bush, Poison Bush, Turkeybush or Turkish Bush

We thought it was a Myoporum based on the leaves, structure & flowers.
But the fruits were eremophila like.
The synonym shows even the experts weren't sure

Leaves are long, thin, entire with a typical myoporum hook on the end.
Flowers are white with 5 petals on short tubes at the end of a stalk. Up to 3 stalks come from the leaf axis and droop down / weep, but generally there was only one flower per leaf.
Structure
🔍Leaves, Buds, Flowers & Fruit
Fruit
LamialesFigwort
Scrophulariaceae
Tar Bush
Eremophila glabra


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NamesCommon Emubush or Black Fuchsia

Very common on Ellura.
Flower colour cannot be used for identification. We have green through orange & various shades of red; with the typical Eremophila shape.
Leaves also vary in shape (rounded end to slightly pointy) and colour. They are stiff, roundish and vary between pale (younger) and dark (older) green, giving the bush a two toned appearance. They are also covered in oil (tar) giving the leaves a rough textured appearance.
Flowers can also be hairy or smooth.
Whole
Our Biggest Glabra
A Mini Hedge (several bushes)
Structure
Leaf
Fire engine red Smooth Flower
Deep red Smooth Flower
🔍Brown red Smooth Flower
Orange Smooth Flower
Reddish Green Smooth Flower
Green & Red Smooth Flower together
Red Hairy Flower
Orange Hairy Flower
Fruit & Leaves
New Fruit
Fruit
LamialesFigwort
Scrophulariaceae
Spotted Emubush
Eremophila maculata ssp maculata
VU
mr
 
In bloom
Leaves
Bud
Hanging Flower, profile, & Bud
🔍Flower with spots
Flower, no spots, buds and stalk
LamialesFigwort
Scrophulariaceae
Scotia Bush
Eremophila scoparia


iNaturalist
LC
mr
Other Common NameSilver Emubush

Lilac/pale purple bell shaped flowers.
Leaves are thin cylindrical and green.
The plant has an upright, stalky appearance.
Bush
🔍Flower & Stem
Flower
MalpighialesSpurge
Euphorbiaceae
Mitchell's Bertya
Bertya tasmanica ssp vestita


iNaturalist
LC
m
SynonymBertya mitchellii
 
🔍Habit
🔍Buds
🔍Male Flowers
MalpighialesSpurge
Euphorbiaceae
Felted Wallaby-bush
Beyeria lechenaultii


iNaturalist
LC
em
Very similar to the Smooth Wallaby-bush.
Leaves are thicker and slightly curved (so they "wrap around" on the back instead of being flat). Branches are more orange.
The most striking difference is the red buds & "petals" on the flowers.
We only have a few of these compared to an abundance of Smooth.
Whole
Structure (see Black caps)
New Leaf
Felted Leaf
Male Flower
MalpighialesSpurge
Euphorbiaceae
Smooth Wallaby-bush
Beyeria opaca


iNaturalist
LC
em
Short, wide bush, with fruit that starts green drying to pale brown, then reddish brown. Fruit has red cap when young, darkening to black later. The fruit is more like a nut really, very hard to break open when drying, and as can be seen the single seed is quite a larger percentage of the fruit size.
Leaves are dark green on top, pale under.
New growth is lime green, almost yellow, and darkens to a deep bottle green.
Flowers are small, with no petals, and look yellow due to the stamen.
Whole
New Leaf
Leaf Back
Flat Leaf & Red Cap
🔍Bud, Flower & Leaf
Male Flower
Green Fruit
Dried Fruit
Nut inside Dried Fruit
Fruit Drying
Old Fruit Split (after summer)
Fruit Has Fallen
MalvalesMallow
Malvaceae
Australian Hollyhock
Malva weinmanniana
LC
m
SynonymLavatera plebeia

Other Common NameInland Austral Hollyhock

There is some confusion over the botanical name, but it's clear this is no longer called M. preissiana. As such, the 2010 Murraylands survey is refering to this plant, which is the Inland form, not coastal.
Whole
Flower
MalvalesDaphne
Thymelaeaceae
Thyme Riceflower
Pimelea serpyllifolia ssp serpyllifolia
LC
em
An innocuous plant that, having identified it, is suddenly everywhere

It has the tiniest little yellow flowers that look like 10 pin bowling pins.
Through the year it changes appearance dramatically
Over summer it sheds a lot of leaves and looks totally different to it's luscious spring time cover.
Lush spring garb
Slim summer look
Structure
Buds and leaves
Loosing leaves
Flower Profile
Flower, Above
Going to Seed
MalvalesDaphne
Thymelaeaceae
Erect Riceflower
Pimelea stricta
LC
ma
 
Whole
Structure
Flowers & Leaves
MyrtalesMyrtle
Myrtaceae
Prickly Tea-tree
Leptospermum continentale


iNaturalist
VU
a
 
🔍Flowers
MyrtalesMyrtle
Myrtaceae
Dune Tea-tree
Leptospermum coriaceum


iNaturalist
LC
m
 
🔍Habit
🔍Structure
🔍Buds
🔍Flower
🔍Fruit
🔍Bark
Grevilleas
Proteales
Protea
Proteaceae
Comb Grevillea
Grevillea huegelii


iNaturalist
NT
mr
Grevillia flowers don't have petals .... Say what?
While inspecting flower photo's to post we noticed the curled back "petal" actually contains anthers in the tips. How can this be?
Petals are just that, they aren't part of the sexual organs of a flower.
Ahhh, further investigation .... we find they aren't petals but TEPALS.
These are structures like petals, that don't fall into a proper definition of petal or sepal.
Whole
Leaves & Habit
New Leaves
Buds
🔍Flowers
Flowers
🔍Tepals
Grevilleas
Proteales
Protea
Proteaceae
Pincushion Hakea
Hakea laurina
Ir
c
 
🔍Habit
Flower
Roses
Rosales
Buckthorn
Rhamnaceae
Mallee Cryptandra
Cryptandra magniflora


iNaturalist
NT
m
SynonymCryptandra propinqua

The most notable difference between these and other cryptandra species are the bronze/brown bracts that cover the flower tube.
🔍Habitat
🔍Habit
Leaf
🔍Buds
🔍Flowers
🔍Flower
Roses
Rosales
Buckthorn
Rhamnaceae
Cryptandra
Cryptandra sp


iNaturalist
LC
em
A very stiff structure, reminiscent of boxthorn. Leaves are dark green and tiny, looking cylindrical. On first inspection these looked like the flowers are a compound of white balls. A closer look reveals this to be creamy white buds mixed in with tiny bell flowers. As flowers bloom, the "white balls" get a spiky appearance, due to the bell flowers 5 triangular tipped petals. Flowers die to a pretty apricot colour adding to the display.
We originally thought these were Cryptandra tomentosa. While investigating a different Cryptandra species on Bakara CP we discoved that C. tomentosa isn't supposed to have the spikes/short branchlets.
We then thought they were Cryptandra sp. Floriferous, but have since seen the key we used is not particularly accurate.
Guy Taseski kindly let us know the SA Herbarium are working on Cryptandra at the moment, so we'll wait until we can get the paper to see if we can get a more accurate id on these amazing little bushes.
Ours look very similar to Westringia rigida when walking past. You have to get close to see the difference and then it's difficult out of flowering season.
Bush
Structure
Buds
Flowers
SantalalesSandalwood
Santalaceae
Leafless Cherry
Exocarpos aphyllus
LC
emr
SynonymExocarpus aphyllus

Other Common NamesNaked Lady or Current Bush

Literally, no leaves, just green stems that are similar to the wait-a-while leaf.
A small tree rather than a bush in some situations.
Seedling
Bush
Bud with mites
Bud Opening
Flower
Size Comparison
Fruit & New Stem
New Fruit
Fruit
🔍Ripening Fruit
Ripe Fruit
Fruited & Stem Starting
New Stems
SapindalesNitrariaceaeNitre-bush
Nitraria billardierei
LC
emr
SynonymNitraria schoberi

Other Common NamesDillon Bush, Native Grape, Nitre Bush or Wild Grape

Thank you Kitty & Tony for identifying this species for us

Our one and only specimen (so far) is tucked behind a big Caletris, which has then had a major branch fall on it. So we've not been able to get a photo of the whole.
Since it's so shady, we also suspect this is why there is no fruit on it.
Structure
Structure
Leaves, ~10-20mm long
Pods Forming
Whole
Habit
Bud Opening
Flower
SapindalesCitrus
Rutaceae
Blue Boronia
Boronia coerulescens ssp coerulescens


iNaturalist
LC
m
Thank you Ralph Foster & Alan Dandie for confirming the id of this species for us

There were a number of bushes with these pink flowers on them. Clearly a genetic aberation.
Darren Schmitke thought they were "sports".
But then he & Marie discovered they looked like different plants, coming out of the ground a couple of centimetres apart.
We still think they are a type of "sport", but suckering from the roots rather than up the stem as a branch.
This occurred with a number of plants and they all looked like one plant. There wasn't a pink flowering plant on it's own.
🔍Habit
🔍Pink Flower
🔍White Flower, Blue Buds
🔍Bluish-pink Flower
SapindalesCitrus
Rutaceae
Desert Boronia
Boronia inornata ssp leptophylla


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NameDryland Boronia

The buds are prettier than the flower; Hot pink shades which gives the whole shrub a pink colouration (this fades as it blooms).
The buds and flowers range from white to deep pink. The buds can also be single coloured or variegated.
Cylindrical / baseball bat, green, shiny leaves.
New stems are rusty brown.
Whole
Structure
Buds
Buds & leaves
Buds & leaves
Flowers
Flower
🔍Flowers
SapindalesCitrus
Rutaceae
Oil Bush
Geijera linearifolia


iNaturalist
LC
em
Other Common NameSheep Bush

A plain looking, woody, large bush.
Has very small white flowers, with small spherical black fruit. Each fruit is encased in a protective skin that sheds when ripe.
Leaves are long, thin and pale green.
Bush
Structure
Bud
Leaf & Bud
Flower
Starting to Fruit
Fruit
Fruit Splitting
Seed
SapindalesCitrus
Rutaceae
Small-leaf Microcybe
Microcybe multiflora ssp multiflora


iNaturalist
RA
em
Other Common NameRed Microcybe

A small, woody, round, dark green bush.
The cream & white compound flowers, at the end of stems, make the bush look very attractive in spring. Then in summer it takes on classy rustic red tones.
The "red" must surely refer to the seed heads when it's finished flowering.
The leaves are small, giving the stems a conifer look about them.
The seed pods are so small they are barely visible with the naked eye.

Exploration of Ellura has uncovered some amazing surprises. The unique & diverse way our natives survive & propagate is enthralling. Take for example the tiny seeds here. Each one delicately wrapped and grown in it's own clam shell pod; then ejected into the world hoping for a suitable place to germinate.
Bush in flower
Bush in seed
Structure in Flower
Structure in Seed
Bud, leaves, flower & stem
Flower
Dried Flower
Green Pod
Pod Drying with Split Line
Seed Emerging
Seeded with Green Pods
No more Seed
SapindalesSoapberry
Sapindaceae
Desert Hop-bush
Dodonaea stenozyga


iNaturalist
LC
em
This is the only specimen we've found so far, and being male don't expect any fruit.
Shrub
Structure
New Leaf Growth
Leaf & Male Flowers
Male Flowers
SapindalesSoapberry
Sapindaceae
Narrow-leaf Hop-bush
Dodonaea viscosa ssp angustissima


iNaturalist
LC
emr
A plain looking, woody, large bush.
But after it has flowered, it is covered in red fruit (with wings). Similar shape to Zygophyllum fruit, but very red.
The red jewel bugs hide well in the bush at this time of year.
Leaves are reasonably small, long and thin.
We have masses of these; such that after fruiting is over the ground is covered in a carpet of fallen fruit.
The fruit is not your typical fleshy variety; rather thin leaf like material with a seed in the middle of the wings.
More a seed pod with wings than fruit.
Bush
Leaf
Buds
Male Flowers Opening
Bunch of Male Flowers
Male Flowers Drying
Fruit & Leaf
Mass of Green Fruit
A Red Fruit
Dried Fruit on Shrub with Seed
SapindalesSoapberry
Sapindaceae
Wedge-leaf Hop-bush
Dodonaea viscosa ssp cuneata
RA
ema
Thank you Andrew Allanson for identifying this species for us

This is the only specimen of this species we've found so far, but it fruited well so we suspect another nearby.
It is well protected under a Sugarwood, surrounded by dead/fallen Callitris branches. As such it's well shaded from the sun and wind; which it seems to thrive on.
Shrub
Leaf, Front
Leaf, Back
Structure
Female Red Flower
Female Buff Flower
Female Flower Head
Female Flower Head
New Fruit
Dark Fruit (young)
Pale Fruit (older)
New Growth
SolanalesNightshade
Solanaceae
Australian Boxthorn
Lycium australe
LC
mr
Thank you Andrew Allanson for identifying this species for us

Typical boxthorn, and difficult to distinguish with the weed. Has small white flowers.
A difference between this native and the introduced African Boxthorn (Lycium ferocissimum) is that the weed can be greener and luscious.
For us, the easiest difference to spot was that the stamens (in the flower) of the weed are very long and protude well beyond the petals. With the native they are short and nearly level with the petals.
Several Old
Luscious
Succulent Leaves
Leaf, ~30mm long
Flower, profile
Flower, front, ~7mm wide
SolanalesNightshade
Solanaceae
African Boxthorn
Lycium ferocissimum
If
em
Thank you Andrew Allanson for identifying this species for us

These are a declared noxious weed.
Ooops. We thought we had the native. Our specimens generally looked very sparse and easy to mistake with the native (Lycium australe)
As soon as we realised (yesterday, 5 March 2014), we cut & swabbed them.
This situation highlights the need for web sites like ours: To help land owners & conservationists identify introduced species & eradicate them; giving natives more nutrients/water/space to grow. Which in turn gives native animals better things to eat & places to live in. Notice how natives always seem to be attacked by insects but introduced species aren't? Native insects depend on native plants to survive as they don't recognise introduced plants as useful. Birds & lizards thrive on insects. Ergo; less weeds = more birds & lizards. We've heard that if all the insects died today, man-kind would be extinct in 6 months!
Bush
Structure
New Leaves
Leaves & structure
New Bud
Bud
Bud, perspective
Base of Flower; Long Stamen
Flower
Flower
Dried Flower
Dried Flower, Fruit Forming
Fruit Further Developing
Fruit, Still Green
Green Fruit, Perspective with Structure
Ripe Red Fruit
ZygophyllalesCaltrop
Zygophyllaceae
Shrubby Twinleaf
Roepera aurantiaca


iNaturalist
LC
emr
SynonymZygophyllum aurantiacum

Other Common NamesBiarpiti or Native Hop

A hardy plant that has beautiful yellow flowers, with 4 petals.
Twinleaf refers to the fact the leaves always branch off, in the middle, into 2 leaflets.
Leaves are dark green and succulent, but much more cylindrical than the pointed twinleaf.
It has large, winged, pale green fruit.

Biarpiti grub (Endoxyla biarpiti) larvae feed on the roots of this plant. The aboriginal name of this plant is Biarpiti, ergo Biarpiti grubs.
Flowering
Drying (yellow)
Drying (brown)
Structure & Leaves
Flower
ZygophyllalesCaltrop
Zygophyllaceae
Climbing Twinleaf
Roepera eremaea
NT
em
SynonymZygophyllum eremaeum

Other Common NameNative Hop
 
Fruit

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