Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach, SA, 5354
                      
NB: Only Orthoptera (Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids) are shown here. Plant hoppers, etc. are under Hemiptera on the "Beetles, Cockroaches & True Bugs" page.
Stat'NotesThumbnails: 404.   59 native species listed, with 49 from Ellura
Animals (Animalia) - Jointed Legs (Arthropoda) - Insects (Insecta)
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Striped Grasshopper
Apotropis vittata


iNaturalist
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Thank you Robert Read & Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

Females are ~26-29mm long. The one male we measured was ~17mm long.
Inside leg/thigh & tibia are dark grey, almost black.
Body colours are variable, the quantity of photo's here is to present some of the variation of colour forms. We photographed 5 specimens so fare, in Oct, Nov & March. Females: S2 was 26mm, S4 27mm & S5 28mm.
🔍Female, S1, dorsal
🔍Female, S2, dorsal
🔍Male, S3, dorsal
🔍Female, S4, dorsal
🔍Female, S5, dorsal
🔍Female, S2, profile
🔍Male, S3, profile
🔍Female, S4, profile
🔍Female, S5, profile
🔍Male, S3, Antennae
🔍Female, S5, Fastigium
🔍Female, S5, Pronotum in profile
🔍Female, S4, Prosternal process
🔍Female, S5, Prosternal process
🔍Female, S2, Inside Hindleg Colour
🔍Female, S4, Inside Hindleg Colour
🔍Female, S5, Inside Hindleg Colour
🔍Female, S4, Inside Hindleg & Foot Colour
🔍Female, S5, Hind Tibia Colour
🔍Female, S5, Face
🔍Female, S2, Posterior
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Spur-throated Locust
Austracris guttulosa


iNaturalist
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The Female we caught & measured at Ellura was small for a female, ~55mm tip to tail & ~110mm wingspan.
Instar
Adult
Adult
Adult
🔍Female, dorsal
🔍Female, released, dorsal
🔍Female, profile
🔍Female, Throat Spur
🔍Female, Pronotum Outline
🔍Female, Pronotum Punctuations
🔍Female, Face
🔍Female, posterior
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Southern Austroicetes
Austroicetes frater


iNaturalist
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Their red legs, eyes protruding above the head slightly & the profile shape of the pronotum are distinctive for this species.
As you can see, their colour is quite variable.
The last one had a missing leg, which shows the body well. This is a regular occurance with grasshoppers.
This highlights how we flip images so the head is to the left to help compare different species.
Robert Read indicated on iNaturalist that all Austroicetes sp have a type of cross or 'X' mark on the pronotum. If this is missing, it's indicates the specimen is not Austroicetes.
S4: dorsal
S1: profile
S4: profile
S1: Red Leg
S4: Pronotum & Body
S4: Face
S4: ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Australian Plague Locust
Chortoicetes terminifera
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~30mm long. Males are smaller than females
Very variable in colour ranging from vivid green to pale brown. While the colours vary, the patterns of the wings and on the hind legs are always the same. The rear legs are also red.
Notice the stripe on top of the head to the pronotum isn't diagnostic (as it appears on the male but not the female that are mating).
The black "patch" seen on the rear tip of the closed wings helps to quickly separate these from other similar grasshoppers. The "cross" on the back, previously used to separate these, is also found on similar grasshoppers, eg Austroicetes sp.
It seems when they contact another of their species every 30 seconds they go into a mating frenzy, causing plaguing. There must be good conditions for them to start with to encounter so many others in such a short time frame.
While we have photographed 10 separate specimens, as can be deduced in the plaguing shots, we've seen thousands in a day.
🔍Greenish Adult, dorsal
🔍Greenish Adult, profile
🔍Greenish Adult, Head
🔍Greenish Adult, Hind Leg
Brown Adult, profile
🔍Brown Adults, Mating
🔍Hindwing
🔍Forewing
Early Instar
Instar
5th Instar
5th Instar
🔍5th Instar
🔍Plaguing, 24 specimens flying
🔍Plaguing, countless sitting
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Bark-mimicking Grasshopper
Coryphistes ruricola


iNaturalist
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Similar Species: Strong-horned Grasshopper (Retuspia validicornis)
These are a large grasshopper, but we have only managed to capture one adult, yesterday, to measure.
We've had 11 sightings over the last 11 years, in May, July, Aug, Sept & Nov; most being juvenile
The adult was ~31mm, with juveniles range from 21mm-31mm.
There is a near identical species, Adreppus fallax, which seems to have shorter wings. This is not normally a reliable characteristic to separate out grasshopper species. We will update this page as we learn more.
These have very distinctive antennae, being wide at the bottom narrowing to the tip. The segment lengths are very irregular.
Colours vary dramatically from grey through various shades of brown with or without dark/black banding on the sides. As can be seen, they camouflage very well and are difficult to find unless the move.
The inside legs are very colourful, starting with a blue splash at the hip joint, through maroon with or without white lateral dashes on the thigh, finalising in lavendar to purple shins & feet. To see these colours it's best to try and get your subject to climb something; it then stretches it's hind legs out and the colours become apparant. Typically the inside thigh is dark and looks black to the naked eye outside.
S5: Juvi: dorsal
S6: Juvi: dorsal
S7: Juvi: dorsal
S8: Juvi: dorsal
🔍S9: Juvi: dorsal
🔍S10: Adult: dorsal
S4: Adult: profile
S6: Juvi: profile
🔍S10: Adult: profile
S11: Juvi: profile
S3: Juvi: anterior
S4: Adult: close up
S10: Adult: Head profile
S6: Juvi: Fastigium
S6: Juvi: Antenna
🔍S10: Adult: Rear Inside Leg Colour
🔍S10: Adult: Rear Inside Hip Colour
🔍S9: Juvi: Rear Inside Leg & Hip
🔍S10: Adult: Camouflage
S5: Juvi: ventral
S6: Juvi: ventral
S10: Adult: Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Lichen Stonehopper
Cratilopus sp ES01 ?


iNaturalist
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Thank you Ethan Beaver for confirming the id of this species for us

S1 is the only specimen we've captured & measured, ~25mm long.
While they look very similar S2 has some minor differences. It's possible these variations are due to gender, age, environment or different species. In particular, notice the different markings on the pronotum; possibly also a juvenile.
We believe S3 is a juvenile due to it's small size, short antennae (which are darker at the tips) & separated wing buds. It's other markings are the same as 9 of our sightings, except S2.
S1: Dorsal
S1: Abdomen
S1: Anterior
S1: Inside Leg
S1: Head
S1: Ventral
🔍S2: Dorsal
S2: Profile
S3: Juvenile
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Riverina Stonehopper
Cratilopus sp ES02


iNaturalist
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Thank you Ethan Beaver for identifying this species for us

It's not possible to identify these down to species; as such they could all be the same species, or each a different one. The are 4 different species listed under Cratilopus on the ALA.
They are abundant on Ellura.
They are flightless and, due to the one pair we found mating, are able to prove the adults are wingless. While difficult to see, it does seem the adults have two separated/overlapping wing stubs, per side, not one hiding the other. Also note the different sized wing stubs.
🔍
🔍
🔍
🔍
🔍
🔍Mating
🔍
🔍
🔍
🔍
🔍
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Striped Stonehopper
Cratilopus sp ES03


iNaturalist
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Thank you Robert Read & Matthew Connors for identifying and Ethan Beaver for helping with the id of this species for us

After we found the 1st female we photographed here, Marie then found a pair copulating. Always useful to have the pair that are the same species to compare against the books.
We then posted photo's of this pair on iNaturalist where Matthew & Robert analsysed the images.
Matthew said "Cratilopus on the basis of wing length and prosternal process." "Transverse prosternal process in both sexes, short wings, female about twice the length of the male."
While Matthew indicated Catrilopus sp 1 was a strong consideration, he indicated the "shape of the pronotal margin is a little different". Comparing to C. sp 1, Robert said "Male furcula not as broadly separated. Cercus seems longer."
Until these are formally described we don't really have any diagnostics to go by.
S1: Female, dorsal
🔍S1: Female, Close up
S2: Female, dorsal
S2: Female, profile
S2: Female, Face
S2: Female, Leg Colour
S3: Male, dorsal
S3: Male, profile
S3: Male, Face
S3: Male, Leg Colour, above
S3: Male, Leg Colour, under
S2 & S3: Size Comparison
S2: Female, ventral
S3: Male, ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Yellow-winged Locust
Gastrimargus musicus


iNaturalist
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Face
Profile
Dorsal
Hot Pink Rear Leg
Hindwing Colour
Forewing Venation
Released
Instar
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Gumleaf Grasshopper
Goniaea australasiae


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors & Anthony Paul for confirming the id of this species for us

Males ~28mm, females ~40-47mm long, with both exhibiting a variety of colour morphs.
A very high pronotum crest (median carina) which is not notch to any extent by the 3 lines (sulcus). If there is a notch it'll be small and in the 1st line (near the head).
Nymph
Nymph, profile
Nymph, dorsal
🔍Adult Profile
Adult Showing Wing
🔍Adult Colour Variation
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Mimetic Gumleaf Grasshopper
Goniaea opomaloides


iNaturalist
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SynonymGoniaea opomaloide

Thank you Robert Read for confirming the id and Matthew Connors for helping with the id of this species for us

Smaller than other Gumleaf grasshoppers.
We thought some of these were G. volcans. When we quizzed Matthew on the notch in the 3 line (sulcus) on the pronotum on some of the specimens we photographed he said "G. opomaloides can have a notch there too but not always - the key feature is that the pronotum isn't arched at all (it's depressed here in fact which is a little weird)."
Adult: profile
🔍Adult: Colour Variation
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
False Gumleaf Grasshopper
Goniaeoidea sp


iNaturalist
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Thank you Robert Read & Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

~33mm long.
Reddish wings contrast with grey body & off-white pronotum & head. Thru the damaged forwings, it looks like the hindwings are dark brown. Wings end with the abdomen.
Inside hind legs are black lined with dark red/maroon. They are remarkably plain coloured on the outside hinde legs. The rear tibia goes from green at the top thru blue to purple at the base, with purple feet.
Antennae are slightly wedge shaped, with slightly reddish-brown tips from halfway along.
Pronotum dorsally with very straight trailing edged triangle. Pronotoum has 3-4 strong sutures.
Dorsal, close up
Profile
Contrasting Colours
Pronotum in profile
Outside Rear Leg
Inside Rear Leg
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Giant Crested Grasshopper
Macrolopholia sp


iNaturalist
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Thank you Robert Read for confirming the id of this species for us
 
Dorsal, ~40mm
Head, dorsal
Head, profile
Face
Leg spines
Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Black-faced Macrotona
Macrotona cf australis
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The black face separates this out from the Inland Grasshopper (M. securiformis) in the area. We found one of each species on Ellura on the same day.
Dorsal
Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Inland Macrotona
Macrotona cf securiformis
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The one female we found & captured was ~24mm long. The male was ~16mm long.
These have a white face compared to M. australis. Males are smaller and usually short-winged. Females are always fully winged.
S3 Female: Dorsal
S4 Male: Dorsal
S1 Male: Profile
S2 Male: Profile
S3 Female: Profile
S4 Male: Profile, released
S3 Female: Head, dorsal
S3 Female: Head, profile
S3 Female: Anterior
S4 Male: Anterior
S3 Female: Rear Leg
S4 Male: Rear Legs
S3 Female: Posterior
S3 Female: Abdomen, dorsal
S4 Male: Posterior
S1 Male: Ventral
S3 Female: Abdomen, ventral
S4 Male: Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Collared Pardillana
Pardillana limbata


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying and Robert Read for confirming the id of this species for us
 
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Orange-winged Pardillana
Pardillana sp 11
Na
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Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying this species for us

Originally thought to be an unusually coloured Mimetic Gumleaf Grasshopper (Goniaea opomaloides).
🔍Adult
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Wingless Grasshopper
Phaulacridium vittatum


iNaturalist
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~17mm long
These two sightings are important to show both the colour & wing configuration of these grasshopper.
They have variable wing length & stripes can be missing.
🔍Mating
🔍Mating
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Wet-area Grasshopper
Praxibulus sp


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Robert Read for confirming the id of this species for us

Similar to Kosciuscola sp, but as you can imagine from the name, they are an alpine species.
Generally considered to be from the Eastern State, possibly in the Adelaide Hills due to human activity.
They can be green or brown.
Nymph
Adult
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Grassland Grasshopper
Pycnostictus seriatus


iNaturalist
Na
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Dorsal
Profile
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Spotted Bandwing
Qualetta maculata


iNaturalist
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They are known for their thick pronotum (shield on the back). It does vary though. The head is also quite distinctive being quite short but high, with the eyes protruding above the "forehead".
The abdomen is apricot in colour, and the pronotum has varying shades of white to grey.
Thanks to Matthew Connors for picking our miss-id of the nymph. We thought it was Cratilopus; you can see the pronotum shape is wrong for that genus.
🔍Nymph, early instar
🔍5th Instar: dorsal
🔍5th Instar: profile
Adult
Adult
🔍Adult
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Strong-horned Grasshopper
Retuspia validicornis


iNaturalist
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Similar Species: Bark-mimicking Grasshopper (Coryphistes ruricola)
Thank you Robert Read & Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

This is the most southern record of this species we can find.
It's been hot and dry; we are into the 2nd year of a drought. Perhaps more Northerly species are progressing south.
This male was ~26mm long.
Very similar to the Bark-mimicking Grasshopper, we have shown a number of angles of the head to help show some of the differences between them.
Primarily the antennae are broader in perspective to the body, but eye patterns, fastigium shape, etc, all show differences when looking close up in details.
🔍Male: dorsal
🔍Male: profile
🔍Male: Antenna
🔍Male: Hind leg
Male: Fastigium
🔍Male: Fastigium
Male: Face
Male: Head
Male: ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Disappearing Grasshopper
Schizobothrus flavovittatus
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About 27mm, with very variable colours.
Dorsal
Profile
Ocelli
Rear Leg
Green Colour Form
Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Crepitating Spurthroat
Scurra marmoralis
Na
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Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying this species for us

We thought this was Halgania Grasshopper (Histrioacrida roseopennis), but for one thing the antennae are MUCH shorter with this species compared to H. roseoppenis.
Crepitate (in the common name) means to make a crackling sound.
Dorsal
Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Blue-legged Hairy Grasshopper
Tapesta carneipes


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Robert Read for confirming the id of this species for us

~14mm long
🔍Dorsal
🔍Profile
🔍Legs
🔍Fastigium
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Hairy Grasshopper
Tapesta sp


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Ethan Beaver for confirming the id of this species for us
 
🔍Adult
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Salt and Pepper Grasshopper
Urnisa guttulosa


iNaturalist
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Thank you Robert Read for identifying this species for us

A large specimen at ~32mm head tip to abdomen tail.
The "Posternal process" is also called "Throat Spur" in some species. But as noted here it's quite wide and flat, much less like a spur.
🔍Female: dorsal
🔍Female: profile
🔍Female: Pronotum
🔍Female: Fastigium
Female: Face
🔍Female: Antennae Colour
🔍Female: Purple Tibia & Feet
🔍Female: Posterior
🔍Female: Posternal process
🔍Female: Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Red-legged Urnisa
Urnisa rugosa


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying and Robert Read for helping with the id of this species for us

After spending hours trying to separate out Urnisa species, we discovered there's an error with the habitus image on Rentz's Grasshoppers of Australia book, page 181.
We also chatted with Robert about this and he came up with some very useful insights which make it much easier. He translated the orginal description; it's all quite old and confusing as many species have been synonymised into the few we can get in SA now. Sumarised here for you to be able to refer back to easily:
Robert said "For the 3 SA species I would separate them as follows:
1. Pronotum with small tubercules, U. guttulosa
2. Pronotum with large tubercules close together, U. sp. 1
3. Pronotum rugose, U. rugosa"

As an aside, we've been considering the binomial name more as we learn more. We attempt to use it when creating common names for inverts where they don't exist yet. Robert translated the 2 described species in this genus:
guttulosa means "little drops", that is with small tubercules.
rugosa means "rough" or "wrinkled".
Dorsal
Camouflage but Purple Foot
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Eastern Urnisa
Urnisa sp 1


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying and Robert Read for helping with the id of this species for us

This is an undescribed species, that is known about by the experts.
So it's in the Urnisa genus, and labelled "sp 1"; ie "species one".
When a species is formally described it gets a proper binomial name.
Adult: profile, Legs Up
Adult: profile, Legs Down
Adult: front
Adult: Back Legs & Feet
🔍Nymph: dorsal
Nymph: profile
Nymph: ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Short-horned Grasshopper
Acrididae
Sand Dune Grasshopper
Urnisiella rubropunctata


iNaturalist
Na
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Other Common NameLong-legged Grasshopper

Incredibly well hidden/camouflaged grasshopper.
All the legs are very long, particularly the middle pair.
It looked liked a spider at first. We coloured one photo to try and bring the grasshopper out more; but it's not how we saw it.
Dorsal
Profile
🔍Camouflage
Coloured
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Leaf-rolling Cricket
Gryllacrididae
Dark Raspy Cricket
Gryllacrididae sp ES01


iNaturalist
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S3 was the first adult we caught, and it was very sick. Could have been a spider bite, dehydration, etc. At first, we thought it was at it's end of life, but after giving it a drink and keeping it in a container all day it's vitality returned, so we released it.
~24-26mm head & body length. 45mm antennae length.
A reddish brown face (black at some angles) with a white spot between the eyes and two oblong white patches above the antenna base.
Their front legs have two vertical rows of strong spines to catch & hold prey. We were surprised that it was aggressive! David Rentz suggests they are ferocious. We heard it "rasping" it's wings but a video couldn't pick up the sound, it's too quiet.
They are also called Leaf-rolling Crickets because they can produce webbing from their mouths to wrap a leaf up to hide in. Very similar to Leaf-curling spiders.
Even more surprising is that it's wing venation is different from one side to the other. We found this on another specimen, so wing venation isn't diagnostic here. They can also have asymmetric genetalia - possibly can even have male & female genitalia.
We can't be sure the nymph is the same species, but given we have only found one adult species and the features look to match up (spots on the face, etc) it's a reasonable assumption.
We have photographed 6 of these, a female nymph in Nov and 5 male adults in Oct, Nov & Dec.
S3, Adult Male: dorsal
S4, Adult Male: dorsal
S6, Adult Male: dorsal
S3, Adult Male: dorsal, Wings Open
S3, Adult Male: profile
S4, Adult Male: profile
S6, Adult Male: profile
S3, Adult Male: profile, Wings Up
S5, Adult Male: profile, Wings Up
S3, Adult Male: antenna
S3, Adult Male: Face
S4, Adult Male: Face
S6, Adult Male: Face
S3, Adult Male: Pronotum in profile
S3, Adult Male: posterior, dorsal
S3, Adult Male: posterior, profile
S3, Adult Male: Right Wing Venation
S3, Adult Male: Left Wing Venation
S3, Adult Male: Aggressive Stance
S6, Adult Male: Wing Venation
S6, Adult Male: Leg Spines
S6, Adult Male: ventral
S2, Female Nymph: Profile, front
S2, Female Nymph: Profile, back
S2, Female Nymph: Dorsal, size
S2, Female Nymph: Back, dorsal
S2, Female Nymph: Middle leg & foot
S2, Female Nymph: Face
S2, Female Nymph: Front Leg & Foot
S2, Nymph: Head, Mouth Parts & Spiracle
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
True Cricket
Grylloidea: Gryllidae
Mottled Bush Cricket
Eurepa cf marginipennis


iNaturalist
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Adult Male, dorsal, ~14mm
Adult Male, profile
Adult Male, Head, profile
Adult Male, ventral
Male Nymph, dorsal, ~12mm
Male Nymph, profile
Male Nymph, anterior
Male Nymph, Cleaning Antenna
Male Nymph, Antenna
Male Nymph, Rear Leg
Male Nymph, ventral
S1: Female Nymph, dorsal
S1: Female Nymph, profile
S3: Female Nymph, dorsal, ~11mm
S3: Female Nymph, profile
S3: Female Nymph, anterior
S3: Female Nymph, Shoulder
🔍S4: Female Nymph, dorsal, ~14mm
S4: Female Nymph, anterior
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
True Cricket
Grylloidea: Gryllidae
Brown Bush Cricket
Lepidogryllus comparatus
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Adult Male, dorsal, ~20mm
Adult Male, profile
Adult Male, Antenna
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
True Cricket
Grylloidea: Gryllidae
Lined Ground Cricket
Salmanites sp


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors & Tony Robillard for confirming the id of this species for us

We found one female in May.
She was ~10mm long (head+body), with her ovipositor twice that at ~20mm.
A small dark cricket with a heringbone like pattern on her back.
We assume she's an adult by the length of her ovi-positor, which shows she is wingless and therefore flightless; not unusual with crickets.
Typically considered a Northern Australia genera, it seems they also inhabit the dry regions to the South.
Tony suggests "that it is probably new"; ie an undescribed species. This also means that the genus level id could be changed once/if it's described.
🔍Female: dorsal
🔍Female: profile
🔍Female: Face
🔍Female: anterior
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
True Cricket
Grylloidea: Gryllidae
Black Bush Cricket
Teleogryllus commodus
Na
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Other Common NameBush Cricket
 
Female
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Scaled Cricket
Grylloidea: Mogoplistidae
Wandella Ornebius
Ornebius sp


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

Only ~7-8mm long, it's a very flat, wingless species, with an extended "nose". The male has much longer antennae (slightly longer than it's head & body) than the females (about half head & body length). The antennae on both genders are banded, basically brown with small, unevenly spaced, black bands. Ovipositor is ~3mm long.
Listed as Northern Australia location but Adelaide Uni found some in SA back in the 1950's.
3 specimens found (1 x male, 2 x female) in March, April & July
🔍Female: dorsal
🔍Male: dorsal
🔍Female: profile
🔍Female: Face
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Spider Cricket
Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae
Spider Cricket
Endacusta sp


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Not a lot is known of our Australian crickets. Like so many inverts, genital examination is required to get below genus level to species. Since we only photograph with a macro DSLR, we don't have the resolution for that type of work.
We have made some assumptions here: 1. Female age is based on the length of her ovipositor. 2. Females are wingless. 3. Adults males of this genera don't seem to have full length wings.
We can't be sure the specimens here are the same species. But they do look very similar and most were found on the same day.
Adult Female, dorsal, ~18mm
Adult Female, profile
Adult Female, close up
Adult Female, anterior
Adult Female, Rear Leg
Adult Male, dorsal, ~12mm
Adult Male, profile
Adult Male, close up
Adult Male, anterior
Immature Female, dorsal, ~10mm
Immature Female, close up
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Pygmy Cricket
Grylloidea: Trigonidiidae
Ottes Pygmy Cricket
Calperum ottei


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

1st Live Photo's on-line: We found 3 specimens, 2 x female & 1 x male in January, July & August. Given they are a winter species, the January sighting is strange. It was a hot, wet summer.
Mottled reddish brown crickets with a couple of dark abdominal bands and 2 diagnostic central pale dorsal spots. They have a distinctive horizontal black band covering the lower half of their face; which carries through their eyes.
Her ovi-positor sheaths have finely serrated tips; possibly the reason for the families other common name of "Sword-tail" Crickets.
Females are ~5-6mm, with ovipositor ~3-4mm. We didn't measure our male but according to our source "A guide to Crickets of Australia" by Rentz & Su, males are slightly smaller.
Both genders are wingless.
These are well known in the Murray Mallee, and are often found with Mallee Dwarf Cricket (Territirritia tya) in larger quantities; which we've also experienced.
🔍S2: Female: dorsal
🔍S3: Female: dorsal
🔍S1: Male: dorsal
🔍S2: Female: profile
🔍S2: Female: face
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Pygmy Cricket
Grylloidea: Trigonidiidae
Confusing Pygmy Cricket
Pteronemobius truncatus


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

Our first winged pygmy cricket. We found 2 dead females, on the same day in February. While we prefer to use live specimens, we also use dead ones until we find live ones to publish. Unfortunately we didn't realise the insect pots were full of moth scales, so got these covered ruining the quality of the diagnostic we can gather.
Body & head ~6 mm, with ovipositor at just over 2mm.
These are found in the Murray Mallee, but few records can be found on-line.
🔍S2, Female: dorsal
🔍S1, Female: profile
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Pygmy Cricket
Grylloidea: Trigonidiidae
Mallee Dwarf Cricket
Territirritia tya


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

1st Live Photo's on-line: We found 4 specimens, 3 x female & 1 x male in July & August.
Very dark crickets with few markings; males are black while females are dark brown. They have not discernable face markings, which is unusual for crickets.
The females have small pale pairs of spots on their backs (not always visible). Her ovi-positor sheaths have serrated tips.
Females are ~6mm, with ovipositor ~3-4mm, while our male was ~4mm.
Both genders are wingless.
These are well known in the Murray Mallee, and are often found with Ottes Pygmy Cricket (Calperum ottei) in smaller quantities; which we've also experienced.
🔍Female: dorsal
🔍Female: profile
🔍Female: Ovipositor
🔍Male: dorsal
🔍Male: perspective on little finger
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Mole Cricket
Gryllotalpidae
Australian Mole Cricket
Gryllotalpa australis


iNaturalist
Na
a
Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us

About 28mm long (head & body)
The diagnostic black colouration of the wing is not visible at all angles.
The two dimples on the pronotum don't seem to be mentioned anywhere, but both specimens photographed have them
The ocelli look defunct (brown rather than black)?
Had them in our lawn in Lobethal. They were so loud at certain times of the year we couldn't sit under our verandah.
There are very few sightings of these (even less in SA), but that's probably because they live underground. But when you do see them, such prehistoric animals!
Photographed 2 male specimens in March, 10 years less 3 days apart!
🔍S1, Male: dorsal
S1, Male: profile
🔍S2, Male: profile
S1, Male: Wing Venation
🔍S1, Male: Claws
🔍S1, Male: Ocelli
🔍S1, Male: Pronotum Dimples
🔍S1, Male: Mandibles
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Striped Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES01
Na
a
 
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Short Antennae Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES02
Na
e m
 
🔍Mating
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Mottled Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES03
Na
e m
Thanks to Matthew Connors for letting us know the only sub-family we get outside of rainforrests are Morabinae.
🔍
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Bark-mimicking Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES04
Na
e m
 
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
White Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES05
Na
e m
 
Dorsal
🔍Profile, ~10mm
Articulation
Head
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Quad Striped Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES08
Na
e m
 
Dorsal
🔍Profile
Eye
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Pale Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabinae sp ES11
Na
e m
 
Dorsal
Anterior
Ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Mottled Matchstick Grasshopper
Prorifera sp ES01


iNaturalist
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Thank you Dr Michael Kearney for identifying this species for us

Michael explained that both location and the number of antennal segments pointed to this genus.
Male: profile
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Matchstick Grasshopper
Morabidae
Matchstick Grasshopper
Vandiemenella viatica


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Dr Michael Kearney for identifying this species for us

~25mm long. The number of segments on the antennae are diagnostic for this family.
Dorsal
Profile
Antennae
Spiny Rear Legs
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Gaudy Grasshopper
Pyrgomorphidae
Slant Face
Atractomorpha sp
Na
m
Other Common NamesCommon Grass Pyrgomorph, Green Grass Pyrgomorph or Vegetable Grasshopper
 
Nymph
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Gaudy Grasshopper
Pyrgomorphidae
Adelaide Pyrgomorph
Monistria discrepans


iNaturalist
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Thank you Matthew Connors for identifying this species for us

Adult females we've measured are ~27-33mm, male ~17mm & juv' females ~16mm
While we worked out the genus years ago, Matthew id'ed them to species
He said "... Adelaide race. Oddly enough, about 1% of adults are fully-winged whereas the rest all have tiny wings like this." We've only seen flightless specimens. Later, Matthew also id'ed a couple of our juveniles as the same. We were thinking they might be Blistered Pyrgomorphs (M. pustulifera). They are quite similar and very variable. We've included shots of most speciemens to highlight differences & similarities. To help us sort them out he said "The pronotum isn't quite sculptured enough for M. pustulifera and the sides of the fastigium are convex rather than concave (although I'm not sure how variable these features are)" ... the fastigium is the spur on the top of the forehead ... "The key difference that should still be noticeable in nymphs is that the vertex (the section between the eyes) is raised above the eyes in M. pustulifera and is "flat or weakly convex" in M. discrepans." ... "I'm not sure how much the white rings vary in nymphs but in adult M. pustulifera even the ones on the side of the pronotum should have white rings". Thanks Matthew, very useful information that has allowed us to confirm all our specimens are the same species.
We photographed 17 different specimens occuring in every month over 6 months from March to August; over 9 years. We have only ever found adult males with females. Otherwise we find adult & juveniles females on their own.
Robert has since said "Some M. discrepans also seem to have white around the spots", Comparing to M. pustulifera he said "Reliable differences are; Shape of head in profile. Shape of abdomen viewed from above. Rentz et al. state that it is pinched in M. discrepans, but so far I have not seen an image where this is visible."
S3: Female: dorsal
🔍S4: Female: dorsal
🔍S5&6: Pair: dorsal
S10: Female: dorsal
S14: Juvi Female: dorsal
🔍S17: Juvi Female: dorsal
🔍S7&8: Mating Pair: profile
S10: Female: profile
🔍S11: Female: profile
S12: Female: profile
🔍S13: Female: profile
🔍S15: Female: profile
🔍S14: Juvi Female: profile
🔍S16: Male: profile
S10: Female: Fastigium
S10: Female: Fastigium
S10: Female: close up
S14: Juvi Female: Face
S10: Female: ventral
S16: Male: ventral
S14: Juvi Female: ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Pygmy Grasshopper
Tetrigidae
Pygmy Grasshopper
Tetrigidae sp


iNaturalist
Na
e m
Thank you Matthew Connors & Josip Skejo for identifying this species for us

~5mm long.
At first we didn't know what this was, contemplated a Hemipteran bug.
After reviewing the photo's we realised it was a Orthopteran, grasshopper. Given it seemed to have a pronotum that covered the whole body we considered a wingless adult female Rockhopper (Buforniina sp).
Thank fully there are experts out there willing to help with these unusual species.
It turns out to be a Nymph Pygmy Grasshopper!
Josip said "It could be either Tetrix irrupta, or maybe Cyphotettix sp. as Matthew suggested."
Nymph: profile
Nymph: Face
Nymph: Fastigium
Nymph: Pronotum
Nymph: posterior
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Katydid
Tettigoniidae
Upolu Grass Katydid
Conocephalus upoluensis


iNaturalist
Na
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About 15mm long, wingspan ~43mm & antennae ~33mm. At rest the wings extend well past the body.
Variable in colour, they can also be green.
This one was very pale, off white with a green tinge; the brown back wasn't very noticeable with the eye.
Large head & eyes compared with body which makes us suspect it's nocturnal.
Forewings are shorter than hindwings. The wing area near the body is quite strange & distinctive; having a 'ridge' between 2 'dips'; very cricket like.
The anal spurs are diagnostic with these (their shape & location)
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, Wing Base
Male, Short Forewings
Male, Anal Spurs, posterior
Male, Anal Spurs, ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Katydid
Tettigoniidae
Mottled Katydid
Ephippitytha trigintiduoguttata


iNaturalist
Na
a
Other Common Name32-Spotted Katydid
 
🔍Male, profile
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Katydid
Tettigoniidae
Calperum Gumleaf Katydid
Terpandrus calperum


iNaturalist
Na
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Thank you Robert Read for confirming the id of this species for us

~25mm long
Note the black knees and 6 projections under the body.
Location suggests this species and it doesn't match the photo in Rentz's Katydid book of T.splendidus.
But there's precious little info on how to separate out the species.
🔍S2:Female Nymph, dorsal
🔍S1:Female Nymph, profile
🔍S2:Female Nymph, profile
🔍S2:Female Nymph, Back
🔍S2:Female Nymph, Face
🔍S2:Female Nymph, Mouth
🔍S2:Female Nymph, Head, profile
🔍S2:Female Nymph, 6 Projections
🔍S2:Female Nymph, Black Knees
🔍S2:Female Nymph, Cerci
S1:Female Nymph, Released, camouflage
🔍S2:Female Nymph, ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Katydid
Tettigoniidae
Southern Bush Katydid
Tinzeda sororoides


iNaturalist
Na
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1st Live Photo's on-line: This is the 1st record for this species in South Australia, and only the 2nd in Australia, on the ALA website (www.ala.org.au)
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, head
Male, mouth
Male, posterior
Male, ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Katydid
Tettigoniidae
Bush Katydid
Tinzeda sp?
Na
e m a
You can see a pale line which appears to be a ridge above the abdomen behind the pronotum. With the male it's pink, white in the female. This are actually the edges of the forming hind wings. The anterior shot of the male highlights this quite well.
There is also a very pale, broken line underneath the abdomen.
These specimens were caught on the same day. Both were ~18mm long.
The female has a very knife like, curved, ovipositor.
Female Nymph: dorsal
Female Nymph: profile
Female Nymph: antenna
Female Nymph: ventral
Male Nymph: dorsal
Male Nymph: profile
Male Nymph: anterior
Male Nymph: ridge
Male Nymph: ventral
Crickets, Grasshoppers & Katydids
Orthoptera
Katydid
Tettigoniidae
Gumleaf Katydid
Torbia viridissima?
Na
e m a
Thank you Matthew Connors for confirming the id of this species for us
 
Young Nymph
Late Instar, profile
Late Instar, dorsal

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