Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach, SA, 5354
    
These identifications have been gleaned from images only, not examination of specimens, so we use the identifier "cf" to indicate "species looks like"
Stat'NotesThumbnails: 426.   82 native species listed, with 67 from Ellura
Animal (Animalia) - Joint Leg (Arthropoda) - Spider, Scorpion, Mite & Tick (Arachnida)
Spider
Araneae
Mouse Spider
Actinopodidae
Red-headed Mouse Spider
Missulena occatoria
Na
em
A small spider (when compared to a mouse, but when blown up on the computer screen is not something you'd want to meet in a dark alley

Only the males have the red head. The females have black heads, but occationally red fangs.
They are an "old world" (or primative) spider partially because their fangs point down. This is considered by human logic to be a less efficient killing machine. Modern day spiders were designed with hi-tech sideways pointed fangs, not needing to lift the head to kill it's prey.
Red headed mouse spiders don't use their venom very much (according to Qld Museum); thank fully as they are as toxic as it's cousin the Sydney Funnel Web. Funnel Web Spider anti-venom works as well. But it's best not to get bitten in the first place.
**********************************************************
Humans do get very emotional about spiders. With the Red-Back & Sydney Funnel Web given a special place in our culture (they are the most dangerous spiders in the world), but the Funnel web has only about 13 deaths recorded against it (ever). In fact, only 27 fatalities from all spiders in Australia (mainly children, sick & ederly). 138 shark fatalities. About 1 snake fatality a year. At least these animals were here first. Yet 10 people every year die in Australia from introduced European Honey Bees, and somehow people think of them in such a positive way ????
Dummy spit over
**********************************************************
Dorsal
Front
Profile
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Twig Spider
Acroaspis sp
Na
em
There are 4 Orb genera with these twig appendages
1. Dolophones: The twig is at the front of the abdomen, and a "proper" sized abdomen - so not that
2. Heurodes: there is confusion about synonymy with Acroaspis. Until Atlas changes we will accept there are still 2 genera. It's too small, doesn't have the turret head and doesn't have the "bulge" underneath. So not that
3. Poltys: Well the twig is scruffy, but the legs are similar. We still don't have the bulge underneath. The back is ribbed. It says their eyes are widely spread. Ok, clearly not that one
4. Finally here we see 2 groups of 3 eyes on each side of the head that nearly touch, then one eye on each side below that group.
One thing not stated anywhere was it can lay it's abdomen down to look like a long spider, rather than an upright twig. The top of the abdomen is straight, but under is a lovely smooth curve to the "bulge" at the bottom.
Profile, walking
Profile, cowering
Front
Dorsal
Flat (body ~8mm)
Eye arrangement + Palps (adult male)
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Green Orb Spider
Araneus cf circulissparsus
Na
em
 
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Bush Orb Weaver
Araneus eburnus
Na
a
SynonymPlebs Araneus

Similar to Leaf Curling Spider
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Looks like 10 eyes
Hair made it look like 10 eyes
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Slender Green Orb Spider
Araneus talipedatus
Na
a
On first spotting this pretty lady, we thought it was a Lynx spider; due to the spikey legs. Turned out to be an orb spider. It's well camouflaged in green ivy leaves; but has a very small web.
In females, the epigyne has a long scape (a tongue-like appendage)
Female, whole + web (body ~6mm)
Female, eye arrangement
Female, hairy & spiky legs
Female, camouflage
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Long-tailed Orb-weaving Spider
Argiope cf protensa
Na
em
Other Common NameTeardrop Spider
 
Dorsal
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Bush Orb-weaver
Backobourkia sp
Na
em
Other Common NameGarden Orb-weaver

These spiders have some large projections on their back (3 main ones) that are nearly impossible to see unless viewed in profile.
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Twig Wrap-around Spider
Dolophones cf turrigera
Na
em
Volker Framenau said: "These may not be Dolophones turrigera, the genus is completely unresolved and the turret like outgrowths on the abdomen are highly variable. Only examination of the genitalia will get you to a species identification."

When photographing wrap arounds we've found they relax if you put a stick in the box with them.
Profile
Back
Dorsal
Profile
Front
Ventral (~6mm long, ~4mm wide)
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Wrap-around Spider
Dolophones sp
Na
ema
We suspect there are 3 species here. Unfortunately the photo's were taken before we realised we needed to get ventral (underneath) photo's. The eye's raised on a platform is not necessarily a diagnostic feature as once thought, nor is it gender specific. The genetalia is, but these images (photo equipement) are not able to magnify the genetalia to a sufficient size to inspect them.
Female (S1)
Female (S1)
Male (S2)
Male (S2)
Male (S2)
Male (S2)
Male (S2)
Male (S5)
Male (S5)
Male (S5)
Male (S5)
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Elegant Knobbly Orb-weaver
Eriophora cf biapicata
Na
ema
Other Common NameCommon Garden Orb Weaver

The male specimen shown here (found on Ellura) was in poor shape, malnourished and had lost appendages; missing front leg and one palp. Also it's not possible to see the fangs, so may have also lost them causing the malnutrition. Notice the tibial spur on the 2nd leg of the male. This spur is more forward, compared with the Spurred Orb Weaver (Novakiella trituberculosa); only on the male as they are used when mating to stop the female from invenemating him. This spur is more noticable on this specimen as the front leg isn't blocking the view.
The female was found in the Adelaide Hills, some 80kms away. Amazing glod patterns on her back.
Eriophora are highly variable and impossible to separate to species photographically. We have chosen E. biapicata based on location. E. transmarina being more along the Eastern seaboard and not in arid environs.
Both male & female have very spiny legs, which isn't normally very obvious, but with black hairs and golden spines they stand out quite clearly with these specimens.
Male, dorsal (body~13mm)
Male, profile
Male, 2nd Leg Spur
Male, Palp
Male, anterior
Male, posterior
Male, ventral
Female, dorsal (body~15mm)
Female, profile
Female, Eye arrangement
Female, Legs
Female, Humps
Female, posterior
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Knobbly Orb-weaver
Eriophora cf pustulosa
Na
ema
Has 2 projections at the front ,and 4 towards the tail, of the abdomen. It's a small spider, so very difficult to see.
We suspect this specimen is immature due to it's small size.
Profile, Eye Arrangement
Anterior, Eyes
Humps
Waving
Profile, rear
Posterior
Ventral (body~5mm)
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Spurred Orb Weaver
Novakiella trituberculosa
Na
em
This is a very strange spider, a bit of a Heinz 57 variety. It has long thin legs like a Prowling spider, spurs on it's tibia like a Trapdoor, the back of a Backobourkia (triangular with 3 horns) and eyes like a Jumper. Yet small, only about 5mm long. This is a male; the female wouldn't have the spurs. The only thing that was truly unique about it was the dark brown triangular patch on it's back.
Whole
Dorsal (body ~5mm)
Ventral
Profile
Eyes
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Leaf curling Spider
Phonognatha graeffei
Na
ema
As the name suggests they curl up a leaf and dangle it in the middle of their web. Then sit with their legs on the web, waiting for vibrations from prey. They then dart out, snare it and bring it back to the leaf.
Waiting
Waiting
Curled leaf
Anterior
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Orb-weaver Spider
Araneidae
Fat Orb Weaver
Zealaranea cf crassa
Na
em
A very strange medium sized spider. 2 horned, or 2 spined, and pregnant.
Reddish brown, with it's legs well tucked up.
Looks like a gall. Has a white / yellow / pale stripe all around. It's also faintly two tone with the stripe making the letter "U", or "V", on it's back; separating the 2 tones.
It's perched on a Hakea Wattle (Acacia hakeoides).
Pregnant, Front
Pregnant, Front Under
Pregnant, dorsal
Pregnant, profile
Pregnant, Back
Pregnant, Perspective with Bush
Spider
Araneae
Swift Spider
Corinnidae
White-spotted Swift Spider
Nyssus cf albopunctata
Na
em
SynonymsNyssus albopunctatus, Supunna albomaculata, Supunna funerea

Other Common NamesSun Spider, Wasp-mimicking Swift Spider

Thank you Mark Newton for confirming the identification of this species
 
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, ventral (body ~9mm)
Male, dorsal
Spider
Araneae
Swift Spider
Corinnidae
Wasp-mimicking Swift Spider
Nyssus cf coloripes
Na
em
SynonymSupunna picta

Other Common NameOrange-legged Swift Spider

An INCREDIBLY fast species. We haven't come across a faster invertebrate. They can be out of the insect box, over your hand, back to the box, twice around it and onto the table before your reactions have pulled your hand away!
Female, whole -EXTRA-
Female, eye arrangement
Female, ventral (body ~7mm)
Spider
Araneae
Swift Spider
Corinnidae
Swift Spider
Nyssus sp
Na
ema
SynonymSupunna sp

These have recently been renamed. There is quite a variety of them with varying spots (white & yellow) and leg markings (black, orange & white).
Spider
Araneae
Swift Spider
Corinnidae
Marbled Swift Spider
Ticopa cf hudsoni
Na
em
Thank you Dr Volker Framenau for identifying this species for us

This species was only described in 2015
These are the 1st images of this genus on-line

We thought we had a Prowling, Water or perhaps even Orb spider here. A medium sized spider with body length of about 9mm. Very long legs, all about equal length and spacing. Found on our annex wall. It has a lot of red/brown "skin" showing, with a lot of black blotches & spots. Black spikes (like a Lynx spider), with very short white/grey hair sparsely scattered on the body and legs. The abdomen is completely covered (above, sides & below) in short hair; mainly white/grey except for the black hair in a triangular edged stripe down the back and dappled underneath. The legs do have very fine hair on them, but it's almost invisible. It has 4 small spinnerets near the rear tip, not visible from above
Most importantly the eye arrangement: 2 rows of 4 (but the rows are curved, not straight). The 6 largest (most obvious) eyes make a hexagon shape.
Whole (body ~9mm)
Profile
Dorsal, Close
Ventral
Eye Arrangement
Male Palp
Spider
Araneae
Net Casting Spider
Deinopidae
Net-casting Spider
Deinopsis subrufra
Na
a
Highly variable species, generally grey to brown and up to 25mm body length. With 2 very large eyes pointing forward, similar to jumping spider, on the 2nd row. The other 6 smaller eyes are arranged as: 1 row of 2 eyes above, 1 row of 2 eyes below the larger ones, and the final 2 pointing down to the side on raised mounts. Long strong legs. Often specimens have lumps on the side and dark triangular stripes down their backs.
Female, dorsal
Female, Body, dorsal (~20mm)
Female, profile
Female, iso-view
Female, anterior
Female, leg spines
Female, palps
Female, upper eye-arrangement
Female, lower eye-arrangement
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Intertidal Spider
Desidae
House Spider
Badumna sp
Na
ema
 
Spider
Araneae
Intertidal Spider
Desidae
Foliage Webbing Spider
Phryganoporus cf candidus
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Web
Spider
Araneae
Sac Spider
Eutichuridae
Green Sac Spider
Cheiracanthium sp
Na
a
Other Common NamesYellow Sac Spider, Longlegged Sac Spider

They change colour to some degree based on their last meal. A medium sized spider with a pale green abdomen containing a brown strip at the front. Very large large chelicera (the structure holding the fangs) for it's size. She tended to sit with 2 legs back and 6 legs forward.
Female, dorsal (body ~8mm)
Female, profile
Female, abdomen, dorsal
Female, eye arrangement
Female, palps + chelicera
Female, dimples in abdomen
Female, spinnerets
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Sac Spider
Eutichuridae
Sac Spider
Eutichuridae sp
Na
em
 
Male, profile (body~5mm)
Male, anteriror (body~5mm)
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Ground Spider
Gnaphosidae
Ground Spider
Gnaphosidae sp
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (body~6mm)
Male, profile
Male, anterior
Male, Eye Arrangement
Male, Palps, profile
Male, Spinnerets
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Ground Spider
Gnaphosidae
Flat Spider
Hemicloea sp
Na
a
 
Dorsal (body ~9mm)
Profile
Next to 5 cent piece
Eye Arrangement
Spinnerets
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Two Tailed Spider
Hersiliidae
Two Tailed Spider
Tamopsis cf fickerti
Na
em
 
Spider
Araneae
Two Tailed Spider
Hersiliidae
Two Tailed Spider
Tamopsis sp ES1
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body~5mm)
Eye arrangement
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Two Tailed Spider
Hersiliidae
Two Tailed Spider
Tamopsis sp ES2
Na
em
 
Released, dorsal (body ~4.5mm)
Eye arrangement
Ventral
Egg -EXTRA-
Spider
Araneae
Two Tailed Spider
Hersiliidae
Two Tailed Spider
Tamopsis sp ES3
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body~6mm)
Female, profile
Female, Eye Arrangement
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
White-tailed Spider
Lamponidae
White-tailed Spider
Lampona sp
Na
ema
 
Spider
Araneae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae
Wolf Spider
cf Tasmanicosa sp
Na
em
 
Back, coming out of Burrow
Profile, coming out of Burrow
Front, coming out of Burrow
Spider
Araneae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae
Wolf Spider
cf Venator sp
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (~11mm body)
What a pretty boy you are
Male; who's his barber?
Male, profile
Male, ventral
Male, palp
Spider
Araneae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae sp ES1
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (~5mm body)
Female, ventral
Female, profile
Spider
Araneae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae sp ES3
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body ~6mm)
Female, ventral
Eye arrangement
Female, profile, released
Spider
Araneae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae
Wolf Spider
Lycosidae sp ES4
Na
ma
 
Spider
Araneae
Prowling Spider
Miturgidae
Prowling Spider
cf Odo sp
Na
em
 
Male, whole
Male, dorsal (body ~9mm)
Male, profile
Male, eye arrangement
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Prowling Spider
Miturgidae
Striped Swamp Spider
Miturga cf gilva
Na
em
 
Male, body
Male, whole, (body ~16mm)
Male, abdomen
Male, eye arrangement
Male, ventral
Male, palp with spur -EXTRA-
Spider
Araneae
Prowling Spider
Miturgidae
Prowling Spider
Miturga cf lineata
Na
a
Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us

This one has very large spinnerets compared to the others, and strong ventral striping (ie under the abdomen)
Female, dorsal
Female, whole (body ~11mm)
Female, eye arrangement
Female, ventral
Female, palps
Female, profile + released
Spider
Araneae
Wishbone Spider
Nemesiidae
Black Wishbone Spider
Aname sp ES1
Na
em
Other Common NameSilverback

Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us
 
Male, profile (~25-30mm)
Male, anterior
Male, posterior
Male, Tibial Spur & Brush Pad -EXTRA-
Male, Spinnerets - used to line burrow
Spider
Araneae
Wishbone Spider
Nemesiidae
Golden Wishbone Spider
Aname sp ES2
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (body ~12mm)
Male, profile, released
Male, eye arrangement + tibial spur
Male, fangs + palp
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Golden Orb Weaver Spider
Nephilidae
Australian Golden Orb-web Spider
Nephila edulis
Na
ema
This is the usually large, grey spider found hanging from road signs on country roads. One of the most photographed spiders in Australia. The male is red and much smaller. It is only when you see them togethal that his colours make any sense; ie they match her ventral colours.
Female, dorsal, rotated
Female, ventral, rotated
Male, posterior
Male, profile
Male & female, rotated
Spider
Araneae
Red and Black Spider
Nicodamidae
Red and Black Spider
Nicodamidae sp
Na
em
 
Juvenile
Making a web
Adult
Spider
Araneae
Red and Black Spider
Nicodamidae
Red and Black Spider
Nicodamus cf peregrinus
Na
em
Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us

Very unusual palps on the male of this spider. They are all unique, but this one has some external projections on them. We were also lucky enough to catch the spiral shape inside the cup as well.
While a red & black spider, you can see the abdomen has a strong navy blue sheen that is visible in sunshine to the naked eye.
Male, dorsal (body~7mm)
Male, profile
Male, eye arrangement, side
Male, eyes, anterior
Male, palps
Male, palps
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Wall Spider
Oecobiidae
Wall Spider
Oecobiidae sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body~2.5mm)
Eye Arrangement
Spider
Araneae
Lynx Spider
Oxyopidae
Variable Lynx Spider
Oxyopes cf variabilis
Na
em
This one was jumping around like crazy
Spider
Araneae
Lynx Spider
Oxyopidae
Lynx Spider
Oxyopidae sp
Na
em
 
Spider
Araneae
Lynx Spider
Oxyopidae
Lynx Spider
Oxyopidae sp ES2
Na
em
 
Male
Spider
Araneae
Daddy Long Legs
Pholcidae
Daddy-long-legs
Smeringopus cf natalensis
I
ema
Other Common NamesDaddy Long Legs, Daddy Longlegs & Daddy Long-legs

Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us

Very difficult to be certain of species, with out proper examination (as with many of the spiders here).
This genus is unusual for a spider in that the male & female are the same size. Mark indicates the larger palps imply the adult here is a male.
Dorsal (body ~6mm)
Body, close up
Eye arrangement
Ventral, body
Ventral, head
Instar, under palps
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Jovial Jumping Spider
Breda cf jovialis
Na
a
SynonymOcrisiona jovialis
 
Juvenile, female, dorsal (body ~5mm)
Juvenile, female, face
Juvenile, female, rear
Juvenile, female, ventral
Adult, female, dorsal (body ~7mm)
Adult, female, eye arrangement
Adult, female, palps
Adult, female, profile
Adult, female, ventral
Adult, female, "Pedicel" -EXTRA-
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Jumping Spider
cf Jotus sp
Na
ema
Possibly "Tony", an undescribed species.
Male, dorsal (body ~6mm)
Male, profile
Male, posterior
Male, anterior
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Grey Striped Bark Jumper
Clynotis cf severus
Na
em
The cutest of all spiders, the jumpers (Salticidae) do have 8 eyes (not 6), though difficult to see.
Obviously the 2 headlights at the front & 2 side parkers. Going on top of the head, theres a nearly invisible pair, and finally the pair a the back. (2-2-4). Our Bronze Aussie Jumper (Helpis cf minitabunda) probably shows all 8 the best.
Dorsal (body ~7mm)
Face
Profile
Head Articulation
Eyes + palps
Whole, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Bronze Aussie Jumper
Helpis cf minitabunda
Na
ema
 
Male, profile
Male, front
Female, dorsal (body ~8mm)
Female, face
Female, articulation, profile
Female, articulation, front
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Female, eye arrangement -EXTRA-
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Under-bark Jumping Spider
Holoplatys sp
Na
em
Thank you Mark Newton for confirming the identification of this species
 
Female, dorsal (body ~9mm)
Female, body
Female, eye arrangement
Female, spinnerets
Female, rear leg hair
Female, leg spurs
Female, dimples in the cephalothorax
Female, grooves in the abdomen
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
White-banded Jumping Spider
Hypoblemum sp
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body ~7mm)
Female, profile
Female, face
Female, eye arrangement
Female, skull pattern on abdomen
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Jumping Spider
Jotus cf auripes
Na
a
 
Dorsal (~4mm)
Face
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Ant-mimicking Jumping Spider
Myrmarachne cf luctuosa
Na
a
 
Anterior
Profile (body ~6mm)
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Masked Jumping Spider
Opisthoncus cf nigrofemoratus
Na
a
 
Whole, dorsal
Profile
Spider
Araneae
Jumping Spider
Salticidae
Black and White Jumping Spider
Sandalodes cf scopifer
Na
em
Thank you John Douglas for identifying this species for us

John Douglas, from www.tasmanianspiders.info said "Your jumping spider could be Sandalodes scopifer. I'm not 100% sure, but it looks like it."
Male, dorsal (body~6mm)
Male, profile
Male, Palps
Male, lateral pivoting
Male, Head
Male, anterior
Male, posterior
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Huntsman
Sparassidae
Brown Huntsman
Isopeda cf leishmanni
Na
em
Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us
 
Male, whole, dorsal
Male, body, ventral (~16mm)
Eye arrangement
Male, body hair
Male, pedipalps seen from front
Male, pedipalps seen from side
Male, pedipalps close side
Male, pedipalps close front
Female, whole, dorsal
Female, body, ventral
Female, eye arrangement
Female, front, red joints
Spider
Araneae
Huntsman
Sparassidae
Beautiful Badge Huntsman
Neosparassus calligaster
Na
em
SynonymOlios calligaster

Other Common NameShield huntsman spider
 
Dorsal
Eye arrangement
Ventral + size
Spider
Araneae
Huntsman
Sparassidae
Badge Huntsman
Neosparassus diana
Na
a
 
Ventral
Whole, profile
Dorsal
Back
Face
Camoflouge
Spider
Araneae
Huntsman
Sparassidae
Hinky-eyed Huntsman
Sparassidae sp
Na
em
 
Juvenile, dorsal (body~6.5mm)
Juvenile, anterior
Juvenile, eye arrangment
Juvenile, head
Juvenile, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Comb-footed Spider
Theridiidae
Redback
Latrodectus hasseltii
Na
ema
A poisonous spider that can be lethal, but very, very rarely.
Poisoning usually occurs due to picking up material off the ground without gloves. They love corrugated iron.
They are black with a dark red diamond shaped stripe on their abdomen which extends from the top all the way round underneath.
The stipe goes bright red when threatened.
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, palps
Male, ventral + size
Female, posterior
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Comb-footed Spider
Theridiidae
Cupboard Spider
Steatoda cf grossa
Na
a
Other Common NameBrown House Spider

These will make you sick for a few days if bitten. It's related to the redback, so it's quite understandable.
Spider
Araneae
Comb-footed Spider
Theridiidae
Theridiid Spider
Theridiidae sp
Na
ema
Either Achaearanea or Theridion species, but their appearance over lap and this group of spiders has many undescribed species. So this is the best we can get to.
Whole, dorsal
Dorsal
Eye arrangement
Profile
Ventral (body ~5mm)
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Blood spattered Crab Spider
Australomisdia sp
Na
a
Other Common NameBlood spattered Diaea
 
Head
Abdomen
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Rotund Flower Spider
Lehtinelagia sp ES1
Na
em
SynonymDiaea sp

Pale green, small spider (~3mm), with a rotund abdomen.
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Eye Arrangement
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Pointed Flower Spider
Lehtinelagia sp ES2
Na
a
SynonymDiaea sp

Pale green, small spider (~3.5mm), with a narrow abdomen.
Dorsal (body~3.5mm)
Anterior
Profile
Ventral
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Trapezoid Crab Spider
Sidymella cf trapezia
Na
em
 
Male, profile
Male, dorsal (body ~5.5mm)
Male, eye arrangement
Male, body profile
Male, body dorsal
Male, palps
Male, spinnerets
Male, leg waving
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Spotted Black Crab Spider
Tharpyna campestrata
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (body~5mm)
Male, profile
Male, eye arrangement
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
New Moon Crab Spider
Tharpyna sp ES1
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal, spread
Male, anterior
Male, eye arrangement
Male, dorsal, tight
Male, ventral (body ~4.5mm)
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Black Crab Spider
Tharpyna sp ES2
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal, spread
Female, dorsal, tight
Female, profile
Female, eye arrangement, front
Female, eye arrangement, side
Female, dorsal, body
Female, ventral (body ~4.5mm)
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Grey Crab Spider
Tmarus sp
Na
em
 
Male, released
Male, dorsal (body ~4mm)
Male, eye arranagement
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Crab Spider
Thomisidae
Hump Backed Crab Spider
Tmarus sp ES2
Na
em
 
Femal, profile
Femal, dorsal (body~4mm)
Femal, anterior
Femal, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Flat Spider
Trochanteriidae
Flat Spider
Morebilus cf fumosus
Na
em
 
Profile
Dorsal
Front
Dorsal
Spider
Araneae
Venomless Spider
Uloboridae
Venomless Spider
Miagrammopes sp
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (body~2.5mm)
Male, profile
Male, anterior
Male, posterior
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Ant Spider
Zodariidae
Ant-mimicking Spider
cf Cavasteron
Na
em
 
Male
Spider
Araneae
Ant Spider
Zodariidae
Ant-eating Spider
cf Habronestes
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (body ~5mm)
Male, anterior, eyes
Male, palps
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Ant Spider
Zodariidae
Ant Spider
Habronestes cf grahami
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (body ~7mm)
Male, profile
Male, eyes + palps
Male, body, dorsal
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Ant Spider
Zodariidae
Metallic Blue Ant Spider
Habronestes sp
Na
em
Other Common NameBlue-headed Habronestes

Thank you Darren Carman for identifying this species for us

Very much like Swift spiders; they are very fast.
It wouldn't surprise me if they are blue to mimick Blue Meat Ants (Iridomyrmex lividus) We have photo's of them here: Blue Meat Ant, click here

I perhaps went a bit overboard trying to show the white marks, and reflectived hue's, but just found it remarkable.

Unfortunately I haven't managed to get a usable image of the female size, but estimate it's only slightly longer than the male (which is ~5mm).
We have 3 sightings shown here (2f, 1m) and it's possible they are either different species or the same.
It very obviously blue, and looks like an ant running on the ground. Has 2 white "racing" stripes on the side of the abdomen; the anterior one wraps around the front of the abdomen, but the rear stops half way up. Neither contunue underneath. There are also 2 elongated dots dorsally, with a single long stipe at the posterior.
Female, whole, dorsal
Female, eyes + blue carapase
Female, anterior profile
Female, body, dorsal
Female, abdominal stripes
Female, body, sheen
Female, body, sheen
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Male, dorsal (body ~5mm)
Male, eye arrangement
Male, abdominal purple sheen
Male, anterior
Male, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Ant Spider
Zodariidae
Ant Spider
Zodariidae sp ES2
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body~5mm)
Female, Eye Arrangement
Female, anterior
Female, ventral
Spider
Araneae
Wandering Spider
Zoridae
Wandering Spider
Argoctenus sp
Na
em
Thank you Dr Robert Raven for confirming the identification of this species

The first specimen looks like A. igneus, but can't be confirmed without genital inspection.
The eyes look superficially similar to wolf spider. But the top, rear eyes are not as far back, and the front top eyes are closer together (wolf spider top eyes make a square).
We've only seen the males so far and they are about 5mm body length. A 3rd specimen we sighted last week was 7mm body length.
They have very long legs, somewhat like a Ticopa sp.
When you look close enough, from the right angle you can see they have tufts of hair over they eyes, like eyebrows.
Eye arrangement is 4 rows of 2. The pair of eyes on the 2nd bottom row are very small (very difficult to see) and outside of the bottom pair.
1st Specimen
2nd Specimen
2nd Specimen
Tick
Ixodida
Hard Tick
Ixodidae
Tick
Ixodidae sp
Na
ema
 
Harvestmen
Opiliones
Harvestmen
Opiliones sp
Harvestmen
Opiliones sp
Na
em
Other Common NamesDaddy-long-legs, Daddy Long Legs, Daddy Longlegs & Daddy Long-legs

We can't find enough information to get down to even Family level, let alone species.
The Daddy-long-legs name is miss-leading as we also have Daddy-long-legs spiders, which look very similar, but are quite different.
The visible difference between spiders & harvestmen is that harvestmen appear to have one single whole body. Spiders have an obvious distinction between the back (abdomen) & front (thorax). Harvestmen have no spinerets nor venom, but these differences are not visible.
The species we have at Ellura looks like it has 12 legs! But it has 8 legs, like a spider, and 2 pairs of mouth parts. Two very long ones look like knees out the front, then two smaller helper feeders to their side. The long ones are pointed, while the side ones are rounded & hairy.
Dorsal
Front
Profile -EXTRA-
Profile, Long Mouth Part Tips -EXTRA-
Profile, Helper Mouth Parts
Profile, Feeding
Back
Scorpion
Scorpiones
Scorpion
Bothriuridae
Wood Scorpion
Cercophonius kershawi
Na
ema
Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us
 
Profile
Front
Back
Scorpion
Scorpiones
Scorpion
Bothriuridae
Marbled Scorpion
Lychas marmoreus
Na
em
Other Common NameLittle Marbled Scorpion

A small (body is around 10mm or so) very pretty scorpion, but quite poisonous.
The common name is very apt, being of marbled / scaloped patterns with various shades of brown. While marbled it is also quite striped; reminding us somewhat of a parquet floor (sharp edges with woodgrain).
Aparantly the sting is very painful so watch out !-)
They also fluoresce in UV light (not that I carry a UV light around in my back pocket!)
Dorsal, spread out
Dorsal, compact
Profile (~10mm, nose to vent)
Stinger
Ventral showing pectines
Mite
Trombidiformes
Earth Mite
Penthaleidae
Red Legged Earth Mite
Halotydeus destructor
Na
a
Other Common NameRLEM
 
6-8 on Capeweed
Mite
Trombidiformes
Velvet Mite
Trombidiidae
Red Velvet Mite
Trombidium sp
Na
ema
Tiny bright red scavenger. 8 legs. Varying degrees of hairiness, but you can't see the hair with your naked eye.
Hairy
Full
Hungry

Copyright © 1996- Brett & Marie Smith. All Rights Reserved.
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