Ellura Sanctuary, Swan Reach, SA, 5354
    
It's possible 20 different species can look identical (needing dissection to differentiate); as such many id's here don't go to species level
Stat'NotesThumbnails: 523.   152 native species listed, with 120 from Ellura
Animal (Animalia) - Joint Leg (Arthropoda) - Insect (Insecta)
Fly
Diptera
Flower-loving Fly
Apioceridae
Flower-loving Fly
Apiocera Maxima ?
Na
em
Found this big fly being torn apart by tiny ants while it was still alive. We rescued it to ease it's suffering. Thought it was a fat robber fly. Took photo's of it and started to wonder if it was a fly at all. Couldn't see it's halteres anywhere, and realised the ants had already ripped them off. It was clear an antenna was also missing, as well as a lot of the mouth parts. Our specimen is a bit dusty from lying upside down in the dirt.
Dorsal
Profile
Ocelli
Wing Venation
Abdomen, ventral
Thorax & mouth, under
Ventral (~25mm)
Fly
Diptera
Flower-loving Fly
Apioceridae
Flower-loving Fly
Apiocera sp
Na
em
We are not sure if this a totally different species as our other find, or the same species but different gender. It seems such a coincidence to find two within 12 hours of each other.
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Short-winged Robber Fly
Bathypogon sp ES1
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Hairy Short-winged Robber Fly
Bathypogon sp ES2
Na
ema
 
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Yellow Slender Robber Fly
Cerdistus sp ES1
Na
em
 
Profile
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Black Slender Robber Fly
Cerdistus sp ES2
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Orange Backed Robberfly
Mauropteron pelago
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Big Red
Neoaratus hercules
Na
a
Usually the mouth part/proboscis looks thick and we couldn't understand how it pierced it's prey. But here you can see it's somewhat telescopic. It retracts the sharpest point most of the time, but it's extended here.
Male, dorsal (body~40mm)
Male, profile
Male, wing venation
Male, proboscis
Male, foot
Male, haltere
Male, anterior
Male, antenna
Male Genetalia, dorsal
Male Genetalia, profile
Male Head, close up
Male Thorax, close up
Male, ventral
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Robber Fly
Neoscleropogon sp
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Robber Fly
Asilidae
Giant Robber Fly
Phellus olgae
Na
m
 
Whole
Head
Fly
Diptera
Orange Fly
Bibionidae
Compost Fly
Bibio imitator
Na
a
Other Common NameGarden Maggot
 
Female
Male
Size, ventral, Male starting to twist -EXTRA-
Male twisting more
And more
It's like a Bugs Bunny cartoon
He's got her clamped
Wings
Female, ventral
Male, halteres & wings
Male, head & large eyes
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Black Bee Fly
Anthrax maculatus
Na
c
 
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Pointed Bee Fly
Australiphthiria sp ES1
Na
em
We think this is either Australiphthiria albocapitis or Australiphthiria pallipe, but we are not sure which.
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Yellow Backed Pointed Bee Fly
Australiphthiria sp ES2
Na
em
We think this is either Australiphthiria albocapitis or Australiphthiria pallipe, but we are not sure which.
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Balaana Bee Fly
Balaana gigantea
Na
em
Other Common NameBalaana Beefly
 
Back
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Black Bee Fly
Bombyliidae sp ES1
Na
m
 
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Brown Bee Fly
Bombyliidae sp ES2
Na
em
Possibly Systoechus sp
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Large Banded Bee Fly
Ligyra cingulata
Na
em
Thank you Graeme Cocks for confirming the identification of this species
 
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Bee Fly
Staurostichus sp
Na
em
Or possibly Systoechus sp
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Villa Bee Fly
Villa sp ES1
Na
em
 
Back
Profile
Ventral
Flying, Profile
Flying, Back
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Brown-winged Villa Bee Fly
Villa sp ES2
Na
em
We've heard that some insects can have different wing venation on each wing.
This is the first time we've photographed a species and seen it for ourselvs. Note the spike on the right is missing on the left.
This is probably an individual variation.
Female, dorsal (body~13mm)
Female, profile
Female, outside
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, wing venation
Fly
Diptera
Bee Fly
Bombyliidae
Dark-winged Villa Bee Fly
Villa sp ES3
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Blue Snail Parasitic Blowfly
Amenia leonina
Na
em
You could easily be forgive for thinking this was a bee, as it scours the Melalueka flowers. And it's quite timid so hard to get close enough to see the short antennae; that put in the Fly (Diptera) order, not
Face
Back
Front
Profile
Rear
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Maroon Parasitic Blowfly
Amenia sp
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body~10mm)
Female, profile
Female, anterior (cleaning eye)
Female, posterior
Female, wing venation
Female, ventral
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Lesser Brown Blowfly
Calliphora augur
Na
ema
Other Common NameSmaller Yellow Golden Blowfly
 
Female, dorsal
Female, Abdomen
Female, ventral
Female, profile
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Golden Blowfly
Calliphora hilli
Na
ema
Other Common NameHill's Brown Blowfly

Similar Species: Golden Blowfly  
Female
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Golden Blowfly
Calliphora stygia
Na
ma
Similar Species: Golden Blowfly  
Male, dorsal
Male, diagnostic hair
Male, ugly face
Male, rear
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Large Greenbottle
Chrysomya rufifacies
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Blow Fly
Calliphoridae
Australian Sheep Blowfly
Lucilia cuprina
Na
em
 
Back
Fly
Diptera
Gall Midge
Cecidomyiidae
Gall Midge
Cecidomyiidae sp
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Gall Midge
Cecidomyiidae
Red-necked Gall Gnat
Cecidomyiinae sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body~4mm)
Profile
Head & Shoulder
Posterior
Ventral
Fly
Diptera
Biting Midge
Ceratopogonidae
Biting Midge
Ceratopogonidae sp
Na
a
Other Common NameSand Fly

These tiny little flies are on about 3mm long and superficially (naked eye) look black.
Like mozzies, you usually can't feel them bite. But afterwards the area swells up. It is said that people who live in the same habitat build up an immunity to them, but tourists get badly affected.
I squashed one biting me once and it made it 10 times worse. Basically squeezing irritants into the body.
Unlike mozzies, that have a straw like proboscis (like moths), these have 2 sharp "jaws" they dig in and stand up vertical to the skin sucking blood.
Dorsal (~3mm)
Anterior
Profile
2 x "Jaws" -EXTRA-
Fly
Diptera
Phantom Midge
Chaoboridae
Phantom Midge
Chaoboridae sp
Na
em
 
Profile
Fly
Diptera
Midge
Chironomidae
Non-biting Midge
Polypedilum sp
Na
em
Similar Species: Mosquito

Midges look a lot like Mosquitoes.
An easy differentiator is that, at rest, midges hold their front legs up, mozzies hold their rear legs up.
Depending on the photo, a more guaranteed identifier is that Midges have small mouths
Fly
Diptera
Mosquito
Culicidae
Mosquito
cf Ochlerotatus sp
Na
ema
Other Common NameMozzie

Similar Species: Non-biting Midge

Mosquitoes look a lot like Midges.
An easy differentiator is that, at rest, mozzies hold their rear legs up, midges hold their front legs up.
Depending on the photo, a more guaranteed identifier is that Mosquitoes have a very long mouths / proboscis (straw like appendage that males drink nectare from and females suck blood with)
Female, whole
Female, close
Fly
Diptera
Mosquito
Culicidae
Mosquito
Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus
Na
em
Other Common NameMozzie

Mosquitoes look a lot like Midges.
An easy differentiator is that, at rest, mozzies hold their rear legs up, midges hold their front legs up.
Depending on the photo, a more guaranteed identifier is that Mosquitoes have a very long mouths / proboscis (straw like appendage that males drink nectare from and females suck blood with).
The proboscis is made of two parts, a thin inner "straw" and an outer sheath. The sheath protects the actual proboscis. It can be seen in the feeding shot here.
Male
Female, whole
Female, head
Female, wing venation
Female, feeding -EXTRA-
Fly
Diptera
Longlegged Fly
Dolichopodidae
Long Legged Fly
Heteropsilopus sp
Na
a
 
ES1
ES2
Fly
Diptera
Longlegged Fly
Dolichopodidae
Long Legged Fly
Hydrophorus cf praecox
Na
em
Similar Species: Water Floating Fly

Like all long legged flies, these are also metal, but it's not nearly so obvious as most.
It's difficult to know with such small insects what is a real colour and what is a camera artifact as they just look like a little blur with the naked eyes (with with mine anyway

Similar to our other water floating fly, which is a different family.
This one has a line of white hair through the bottom of it's eyes and two white stripes on it's back that are made up of *very* short white hair.
Dorsal
Dorsal
Profile, back hair
Profile, abdomen spots
Profile, eye & hair
Anterior
Posterior, venation
Fly
Diptera
Vinegar Fly
Drosophilidae
Vinegar Fly
Drosophila sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body~2.5mm)
Profile
Being Parasitised
Fly
Diptera
Shore Fly
Ephydridae
Water Floating Fly
Brachydeutera sydneyensis
Na
em
Similar Species: Long Legged Fly

Small light brown & white fly regularly seen floating on water. They float there lapping up water with their elongated mouths at a very rapid rate; so getting 2 drinking at once was pure luck. Took so many photo's to get one with the mouth actually touching the water and in reasonable focus. They are so light they can float on 4 legs while using the front, or rear, pair to clean themselves.
Profile (body~4mm)
Anterior
Legs used as Rafts
Tiny Hairs on back
Head & Facial Hair
Drinking in unison
Close up on mouth
Mouth lapping water
Fly
Diptera
Gall Fly
Fergusoninidae
Gall Inducing Fly
Fergusoninidae sp
Na
m
 
Fly
Diptera
Toadstool Fly
Heteomyzidae
Toadstool Fly
Tapeigaster sp
Na
a
 
Fly
Diptera
Lauxaniid Fly
Lauxaniidae
Red Eyed Lauxaniid Fly
Ceratolauxania sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal & Wing venation
Head
Anterior
Fly
Diptera
Lauxaniid Fly
Lauxaniidae
Orange Lauxaniid Fly
Homoneura cf valida
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Lauxaniid Fly
Lauxaniidae
Metalic Green Tomato Fly
Lamprolonchaea cf brouniana
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body~3mm)
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Female, Wing + Ovipositor
Female, Back Hairs
Female, anterior
Female, ventral
Fly
Diptera
Lauxaniid Fly
Lauxaniidae
Bent Lauxaniid Fly
Steganopsis melanogaster
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Under
Fly
Diptera
Bush Fly
Muscidae
Helina Fly
Helina addita
Na
a
 
Whole
Wing Venation
Fly
Diptera
Bush Fly
Muscidae
Helina Fly
Helina cf tasmaniensis
Na
a
 
Whole
Wing Venation
Anterior
Fly
Diptera
Bush Fly
Muscidae
Bush Fly
Pygophora sp
Na
a
 
Profile + Body hair
Anterior
Antenna
Anterior, under
Fly
Diptera
Midas Fly
Mydidae
Tiger Ichneumon Mimic
Miltinus cardinalis
Na
em
Similar Species: Tiger Ichneumon Wasp

Thank you Tony Daley for confirming the identification of this species

Thank you Liz O'Donnell for helping with the identification of this species

Looks closest to Miltinus cardinalis but not confident to even put it to genus as this stage. There aren't many live specimens to compare against.
Tony D just identified it as Miltinus cardinalis, many thanks Tony
Fly
Diptera
Green Soldier Fly
Odontomyia
Green Soldier Fly
Odontomyia sp
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Bot Fly
Oestridae
Sheep Nasal Bot Fly
Oestrus ovis
I
m
 
Dorsal
Anterior
Fly
Diptera
Scuttle Fly
Phoridae
Scuttle Fly
Megaselia sp
Na
ema
A very small fly. At first it was hard to determine if it was even Diptera, with the hairy face hiding the usual small antennae of flies.
We suspect there are 3 different species here as they are different sizes & colours, but all with the striped body and pronounced hairy face.
ES1: Halteres just visible
ES2: Dorsal (body~2mm)
ES2: Profile
ES2: Posterior
ES3: Dorsal
Fly
Diptera
Smoke Fly
Platypezidae
Flat-footed Fly
Lindneromyia sp
Na
ema
 
Male
Female
Fly
Diptera
Picture-winged Fly
Platystomatidae
Boatman Fly
Pogonortalis doclea
Na
a
 
Fly
Diptera
Moth Fly
Psychodidae
Moth Fly
Psychodidae sp
Na
a
Other Common NamesBathroom Fly, Drainfly, Drain Fly, Drain-fly, Mothfly, Moth-fly

Very hairy little fly. We thought it was a tiny moth, as do most people when they first see them we suspect. While transferring petrol these little tiny insects were attracted to the fumes. So was able to get a number of photo's of them. Unfortunately they then decided to land on the spilt fuel on the container and got stuck. But it gave a chance to measure their size; wingspan of about 6mm, body length about 2mm. They seemed white, but that's probably flash & shiny hairs. Notice in the overhead shot the hairs running along the wing veins. The body seems to have a few lateral stripes.
Profile (body~2mm, wingspan ~6mm)
Dorsal
Scaly Wings
Fly
Diptera
Flesh Fly
Sarcophagidae
Grey Flesh Fly
Sarcophaga aurifrons
Na
ema
 
Dorsal
Profile
Posterior
Fly
Diptera
Flesh Fly
Sarcophagidae
Small Foot Flesh Fly
Sarcophaga sp
Na
ema
 
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Fly
Diptera
Dark-winged Fungus Gnat
Sciaridae
Dark-winged Fungus Gnat
Sciaridae sp
Na
ema
 
Wings
Profile (Body ~3mm)
Whole
Fly
Diptera
Black Scavenger Fly
Sepsidae
Ant Fly
Parapalaeosepsis plebeia
Na
a
 
Fly
Diptera
Hover Fly
Syrphidae
Wasp-mimicking Hover Fly
Ceriana ornata
Na
em
This is the 1st record for this species in South Australia on the ALA website (www.ala.org.au).
Fly
Diptera
Hover Fly
Syrphidae
Native Drone Fly
Eristalinus punctulatus
Na
em
 
Male: Front, In Flight
Male: Profile, In Flight
Fly
Diptera
Hover Fly
Syrphidae
Hover Fly
Melangyna viridiceps
Na
ema
 
Dorsal
Profile
In Flight
& Friends -EXTRA-
Fly
Diptera
Hover Fly
Syrphidae
Yellow-shouldered Stout Hover Fly
Simosyrphus grandicornis
Na
em
 
Abdomen
Wing
Halteres -EXTRA-
Face
Fly
Diptera
Deer Fly
Tabanidae
March Fly
Dasybasis sp
Na
ema
Other Common NameHorse Fly

Oh my; they were really bad this year (end 2014). We couldn't walk 100m through the bush without being attacked.
Typically they appear in March (hence their name) but the favourable weather conditions (hot & dry winter) saw them out in spring.
They are a large and moderately attractive fly (if there is such a thing
, with gentle grey to brown strips.
The eyes on the male are touching, where as the females have a large gap, which is visible with the naked eye.
The females are the only ones that bite, feeding on the blood of animals (including humans). They lay in wait in a cool bush (senna, acacia, etc) waiting for prey to come past, then they pounce. Once they have your scent they won't leave you alone until they've fed (bitten you) or you've killed them.
Sorry, but anything that bites us isn't safe from us, even if it is native.
They are robust and we've hit them and they've fallen to the ground unconscious. They've then woken up and attacked again.
They have a preference for the back of your legs, but will bite through clothing on your back or rump (very painful for some reason).
While not as painful as a bee sting, it is as bad as an ant bite.
Long trousers & baggy clothes are the order of the day, with a good dose of personal insecticide to be safe.
While we can't be sure, it's possible the males buzz overhead, distracting you, while the females attack your legs. The fact they hide by biting you from behind suggests they have some understanding of where you are looking / facing. They rarely seem interested in arms, and walking fast seems to stop them biting (but not following; you have to stop at some point). So perhaps they don't like movement.
Male, dorsal
Male, front
Male, eye
Male, profile
Female
Fly
Diptera
Deer Fly
Tabanidae
Large Mud-nesting Wasp Mimicking Fly
Palimmecomyia pictipennis
Na
em
Similar Species: Large Mud-nesting Wasp

Thank you Tony Daley for identifying this species for us

Here's what Tony said: "What a great looking species, and wonderful record Brett! I'm fairly confident by their colouring and wing markings this is Palimmecomyia pictipennis ... they differ from the original description in only the abdominal dark band being slightly more extensive behind, though apparently these are rare so don't think many specimens have been collected, add to that only two females were examined and the male not known at the time of the description by Mackerras (1960)."
Mating
In flight
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Gold-headed Blue Tachinid Fly
Cuphocera sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Rear
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Black and White Giant Fly
Formosia speciosa
Na
em
This is one HUGE fly. While we're used to Robber flies being longer, they are thin. But this beast is rotund like a blow fly. Thankfully, it wasn't agressive.
It's hard to say if it's pure size is what it stand out so much, or the sharp contrast of the balck & white patterns on it's body. But stood out it did!
It's always been intrigueing to see the 3 jewels on the top of wasp heads. This is the first time we've seen them on a fly. On searching, they also appear on Hover flies. It seems that they are smaller, and so not visible on small or hairy flies.

AHHHH, finally found out. The "3 jewels" as we call them are actually simple eyes, each with a single lens! They are called "Ocelli". Not much is known about them, but they seem to help with detection of the horizon in flight.
Dorsal
Front
Front, profile
Profile
Rear, profile
Ventral
Head, dorsal, showing 3 Ocelli
Face
Body Hair & Spikes
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Mottled Brown Tachinid Fly
Peribaea sp
Na
em
These are all one specimen. Interesting how different reflections can make it look so different.
Wing Venation
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Flower Fly
Phasia sp
Na
em
 
Whole + wing venation
Eyes
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Green Rutilia Fly
Rutilia simplex
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Sand Fly
Senostoma sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body~11mm)
Profile
Anterior
Ventral
Fly
Diptera
Parasitic Fly
Tachinidae
Parasitic Fly
Tritaxys sp
Na
em
Thank you Dr Bryan Cantrell for confirming the identification of this species

We see cases from Faggot Case Moths (Clania ignobilis) quite regularly. We finally found a complete one and thought it'd be gr8 to house it in an insect box by the window (to get appropriate light) to finally get images of the adult.
While disapointed that it was parasitised by this fly, we were excited to discover another species.
Rather than injecting eggs into the case, the mother lays eggs on the food plant / leaf that the caterpillar eats. The eggs don't get digested but stay inside the larva until it grows and when about to pupate, use the energy for itself and consumes the moth.
Still baffled at how it managed to get out of the case (it's incredibly strong); one can only assume it saw light at the end of the tunnel and chewed it's way out.
Dorsal (body ~11mm)
Profile
Face
Posterior
Moth Case
Exit
Inside
Fly
Diptera
Fruit Fly
Tephritidae
False Fruit Fly
Acanthonevroides basalis
Na
a
SynonymsAcanthonevroides bicolour, Acanthonevroides bicolor

Thank you Tony Daley for identifying this species for us

Tony D said "I agree with you on Acanthonevroides, and further keys to A. bicolor, which btw is an SA species. The flies in this genus, like many in Tephridae, are not fruit flies in the strict sense but belong to a family with notorious fruit flies. From Permkam & Hancock (1995) on Acanthonevroides biology : "Biological information is scanty, but the larvae probably develop beneath the bark of trees." "
Fly
Diptera
Fruit Fly
Tephritidae
False Fruit Fly
Austrotephritis pelia
Na
em
 
Female, dorsal (body~4mm)
Female, profile, Ovipositor
Female, anterior
Female, Halteres
Female, Head
Female, Wing spines
Female, Wing's pointed
Fly
Diptera
Fruit Fly
Tephritidae
False Fruit Fly
Austrotephritis poenia
Na
ema
 
Male, dorsal
Male, profile
Male, Wing Venation
Male, Head
Fly
Diptera
Stilletto Fly
Therevidae
Wasp Mimicking Fly
Agapophytus aterrimus
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for helping with the identification of this species

Thank you Tony Daley for helping with the identification of this species

Thank you Chris Lambkin for identifying this species for us

The 1,000th species posted on the Ellura web site. A BIG thank you to all those experts who have contributed their time & energy to help us identify our local species

Tony, who id'ed this to genus, said the strange hair on the back is "elongate scale-like setae on the scutum".
This beautiful fly was ~10mm long, with a very long mouth/proboscis and antennae. Bascially black with 2 orange/yellow bands on it's wings. The lower front tibia (middle part of the leg) does seem to have a small orange band.
Ken Walker saw the observation on Bowerbird and contacted Chris Lambkin who kindly narrowed it down to species.
Mimics the Calopompilus spider wasp quite well: Spider Wasp
Dorsal
Profile (body~10mm)
Elongated scale-like setae on the scutum
Hey gotta go for the eye shot
Anterior, Leg details
Anterior, facial hair
Fly
Diptera
Stilletto Fly
Therevidae
Stilletto Fly
Taenogerella sp
Na
em
 
Fly
Diptera
Crane Fly
Tipulidae
Long-palped Crane Fly
Ischnotoma eburnea
Na
a
 
Female, back
Female, profile, whole
Female, profile, body
Female, head
Male, back
Male, profile
Male, head
Fly
Diptera
Crane Fly
Tipulidae
Short-palped Crane Fly
Symplecta pilipes
Na
em
The big visual difference between Crane flies & Scorpion flies is that Scorpion flies (Order Mecoptera) have 4 wings and are not true flies.
Crane flies are true flies which all have 2 wings and 2 clubs (halteres). Due to their slender bodies the Crane fly halteres are much easier to see than with many other fly species.
Whole
Body
Head
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Golden Black Sugar Ant
Camponotus aeneopilosus ssp aeneopilosus
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Vertical Gaster Black Ant
Camponotus cinereus ssp amperei
Na
em
These ants walk around with their backside, or gaster, stuck up in the air. Very unique behaviour
Profile
Above
Colony showing Soldiers & Workers
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Nocturnal Sugar Ant
Camponotus consobrinus
Na
em
 
Whole
Back
Petiol & Gaster
Mandibles
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Jumbuck Sugar Ant
Camponotus ephippium ssp ephippium
Na
em
The shape of the back, face and the petiol are diagnostic. This is a minor worker and is about 9mm long. There are no pictures of this species anywhere on the net, so it's taken years to finally find out what it is; using this excellent, ameteur friendly key from the SA museum
Whole -EXTRA-
Back & petiole
Face
Colour Difference inside
Ventral
Mandibles
Hairy Legs
Leg Spines
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Black-headed Sugar Ant
Camponotus nigriceps
Na
em
This is probably our most abundant Camponotus species. As such, we have included photo's of a Male Alate here. While we are certain the male is a Camponotus genus, we cannot be sure which species it belongs to.
Worker, Whole, dorsal
Soldier, Whole, dorsal
Worker, Spine on the Petiole -EXTRA-
Worker, Leg Spurs & Body Hair
Soldier Mandibles
Nest, Whole
Nest, Entrance
Soldier & Worker size comparison
Male Alate, dorsal
Male Alate, profile
Male Alate, anterior
Male Alate, Wing Venation
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Agile Tyrant Ant
Iridomyrmex agilis
Na
em
There are two specimens here, one smaller than the other. While it's possible they are different species, we suspect they are a different hierarchy of worker. Depending on the species, these heirarchies can consit of minor, medium & major workers. Major workers are also known as soldier ants.
Dorsal (S1, body~6mm); minor? worker
Dorsal (S2, body~7mm); medium? worker
Profile (S2)
Anterior (S2)
Ventral (S2)
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Blue Meat Ant
Iridomyrmex lividus
Na
em
Thank you Mark Newton for helping with the identification of this species
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Mono Ant
Monomorium kiliani
Na
a
 
Dorsal
Profile, petiol
Winged
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Giant Red Bull Ant
Myrmecia nigriscapa
Na
a
 
Close, dorsal
Whole, dorsal
Abdomen
Front Leg Spurs
Rear Leg Spurs
Shoulder
Head, dorsal
Head, front
Neck & 3 Jewels (actually 3 Ocelli) -EXTRA-
Antenna Socket, Eye, Mandibles & Foot
Antenna
Nest
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Small Jumping Ant
Myrmecia picta
Na
a
Thank you Mark Newton for identifying this species for us
 
Dorsal
Queen, with wings
Profile, eating
Head & Shoulder
Abdomen & Back Legs
Antenna, Mandibles & Mouth
Down the pub discussing footy
Cleaning the House
Home Renovations
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Inch Ant
Myrmecia sp
Na
ema
Other Common NameBull Ant

Black head and tail.
Orange body, pincers and legs.
Mark Newton says it might be M desertorum
Front
Profile
Dorsal
Mandibles
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ant
Ant: Formicidae
Titan Pony Ant
Rhytidoponera mayri
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Long-tongued Bee
Bee: Apidae
Blue Banded Bee
Amegilla chlorocyanea
Na
ema
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us

Dr Ken Walker said "The colour of the bands fades with age and the amount of orange varies in a species like A. chlorocyanea."
Donella Billett told us that males have five bands and females have four.
Old Male
Old Male
Adelaide Hills
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Long-tongued Bee
Bee: Apidae
European Honey Bee
Apis mellifera
I
ema
Other Common NameCommercial Honey Bee

Most people think of these insects in a positive light, but they have decimated our native bee population and should be eradicated where possible.
Please don't allow bee keepers to "use" your bush block for bees.
Would you allow someone to plough your block to grow crops? European Bees are just as devastating, but the damage is hidden, and they spread over many kilometres to neighbouring properties & reserves. Our native bees are also less aggressive and usually solitary.
Female worker
New Colony
New Colony
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Colletid Bee
Bee: Colletidae
Colletid Bee
Euhesma bronzus
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us

Dr Ken Walker said "If you look closely at the legs on this bee they are almost hairless - they cannot carry pollen. This is one of Australia's many unique euryglossine bees that carry their pollen load in the crop - first part of the stomach."
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Colletid Bee
Bee: Colletidae
Red Hylaeine Bee
Hylaeus lateralis
Na
em
 
Profile (body~5mm)
Face
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Colletid Bee
Bee: Colletidae
White-shouldered Red Bee
Hylaeus sp
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Colletid Bee
Bee: Colletidae
Copper Metallic Bee
Leioproctus clarki
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Small Bee
Bee: Halictidae
Wahlenbergia Bee
Homalictus urbanus
Na
em
Other Common NameGreen Backed Bee

Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Small Bee
Bee: Halictidae
Halictid Bee
Lasioglossum lanarium
Na
a
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Small Bee
Bee: Halictidae
Gold Nomia Bee
Lipotriches australica
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Small Bee
Bee: Halictidae
Metallic Green Nomia Bee
Lipotriches flavoviridis
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us

Ken Walker said "Two characters in your image show this is not a Homalictus. 1. The large amount of hair on the hind legs (especially the hind femur and tibia). Homalictus carries its pollen load on the underneath of its abdomen. 2. The wing photo shows an elongate (much longer than the 2nd submarginal cell) and strong 3rd submarginal cell. In Homalictus, the 3rd submarginal cell is about the same length as the 2nd submarginal cell but the veins are weaker than those veins of the 2nd submarginal cell"
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Leafcutter Bee
Bee: Megachilidae
Black Resin Bee
Megachile atrella
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for identifying this species for us
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Leafcutter Bee
Bee: Megachilidae
Golden-browed Resin Bee
Megachile aurifrons
Na
em
Other Common NameRed-faced Mastic Bee
 
Female Head
Female Face
Female Wings
Female Profile
Female Back
Female Abdomen
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Leafcutter Bee
Bee: Megachilidae
Red-browed Leaf-cutter Bee
Megachile chrysopyga
Na
em
The photo's are in reverse order showing a bee leaving after checking out a disused hollow from a Mud nesting wasp.
Dorsal
Abdomen
Posterior
Inside nest
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Leafcutter Bee
Bee: Megachilidae
Gold-barred Resin Bee
Megachile leucopyga
Na
em
 
Profile
Back
White, ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Sawfly
Sawfly: Pergidae
Eucalypt Sawfly
Perga sp
Na
ema
Other Common NameSpitfire
 
Larvae: Group
Larvae: Small Group
Larva: Whole Back
Larva: Whole Profile
Larva: Head
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Sawfly
Sawfly: Pergidae
Zebra Sawfly
Pergagrapta turneri
Na
ema
Other Common NameSpitfire
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Parasitic Wasp
Wasp: Braconidae
Red Braconid Wasp
Braconidae sp ES1
Na
em
Similar Species: Braconid Mimic Longhorn
Long ovipositor. There is a Longhorn Beetle (Hesthesis sp) that resembles this wasp.
Female, dorsal
Female, ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Parasitic Wasp
Wasp: Braconidae
Orange Braconid Wasp
Braconidae sp ES2
Na
em
Medium length ovipositor
Female, dorsal
Female, profile
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Parasitic Wasp
Wasp: Braconidae
White Flank Black Braconid Wasp
Braconidae sp ES3
Na
a
Possibly Syngaster lepida
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Chalcidid Wasp
Wasp: Chalcididae
Hopping Wasp
Brachymeria sp
Na
ema
Other Common NamesChalcid Wasp or Parasitoid Wasp

Thank you Graeme Cocks for identifying this species for us
 
Dorsal (~5mm long)
Profile
Front
Under
Cleaning Wings
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Cuckoo Wasp
Wasp: Chrysididae
Small Cuckoo Wasp
Chrysis sp
Na
a
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for helping with the identification of this species

These are under 10mm. While a visually identical species, Stilbum, is closer to 20mm
Profile
Dorsal
Rolled up (body ~5mm)
Abdomen Cavity/Shell
Facial Indent
Antenna in Facial Indent
Outer abdomen + Ovipositor
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Sand Wasp
Bembix sp ES1
Na
em
Females do the digging to lay their eggs, and so have digging spines on their front legs (specifically their tarsi which are the feet, the sections between the tibia & the claw).
Each species apparantly makes a different pattern in the sand to cover/hide their nest.
Female, dorsal, In Flight
Female, anterior, Digging
Female, posterior
Female, Digging a Trench
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Sand Wasp
Bembix sp ES2
Na
em
Each time we get a usable photo of this species it has slightly different markings. While we show 4 different variations here, we only count them as one species as there is no readily available information we can find about their differences.
These markings could be age, gender or species variations; or simple variations from specimen to specimen.
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Sand Wasp
Bembix sp ES3
Na
em
It appears adult Sand Wasps eat pollen, but have no pollen carrying ability to feed their young. In fact it seems they feed their young flies!
We can hardly wait to photograph one filling it's nest with a fly to show you.
Dorsal
Posterior
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Sand Wasp
Bembix sp ES4
Na
em
Notice the 2 ventral shots with this specimen. They seem very different, but the black marks are hidden when it curves it's abdomen in; they were only visible when it fully stretched out.
Female, dorsal (body~18mm)
Female, profile
Female, Wing Venation
Female, Digging Spines on the Tarsi
Female, Digging Spines on the Tarsi
Female, ventral showing Black
Female, ventral hiding Black
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Small Black Digging Wasp
Larrinae sp
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Black Sand-dauber Wasp
Pison sp
Na
em
Similar Species: Zebra Spider Wasp
 
Wings
Profile
Dead, ventral & size (~12mm long)
Dead, Face
Dead, Abdomen -EXTRA-
Dead, Profile
Dead, Back
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Digging Wasp
Wasp: Crabronidae
Black Sand-loving Wasp
Tachysphex sp
Na
em
Thank you Reiner Richter for identifying this species for us

Dr Ken Walker said "The important part of the wing venation is the elongate 3rd submarginal cell"
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ensign Wasp
Wasp: Evaniidae
Hatchet Wasp
Szepligetiella sp
Na
ema
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Gasteruptiid Wasp
Wasp: Gasteruptiidae
White-footed Gasteruptiid Wasp
Gasteruption sp ES1
Na
a
 
Male, Body
Male, Wing Venation
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Gasteruptiid Wasp
Wasp: Gasteruptiidae
Banded-legged Gasteruptiid Wasp
Gasteruption sp ES3
Na
em
These are very thin wasps and difficult to see. The shadow is more visible than the wasp. After nearly 40 photo's with the zoom lens we were lucky to get a reasonably sharp one. It eluded capture however, so wasn't able to get a size nor detailed images. Next year
Female in flight
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Gasteruptiid Wasp
Wasp: Gasteruptiidae
White-faced Gasteruptiid Wasp
Gasteruption sp ES4
Na
em
 
Male, dorsal (antennae~8mm)
Male, profile (body~10mm)
Male, Wing Venation
Male, Face
Male, anterior
Male, ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Gasteruptiid Wasp
Wasp: Gasteruptiidae
Tiny Black Gasteruptiid Wasp
Pseudofoenus sp ES2
Na
em
Thank you Graeme Cocks for identifying this species for us
 
Anterior (S1)
Profile (S2)
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ichneumon Wasp
Wasp: Ichneumonidae
Cream-spotted Ichneumon Wasp
Echthromorpha intricatoria
Na
a
A reasonably common wasp in the Adelaide Hills, yet we've not seen any in the Murraylands yet.
These wasps parisitise lepidoptera pupae.
The females have a medium sized ovipositor and are considerably larger than the males (about 18mm compared with 11-12mm for the males).
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ichneumon Wasp
Wasp: Ichneumonidae
Banded-abdomen Ichneumon Wasp
Ichneumonidae sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal
Profile
Anterior
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ichneumon Wasp
Wasp: Ichneumonidae
Bee Parasitizing Wasp
Labium sp
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ichneumon Wasp
Wasp: Ichneumonidae
Orchid Dupe Wasp
Lissopimpla excelsa
Na
em
 
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Female, back
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ichneumon Wasp
Wasp: Ichneumonidae
Tiger Ichneumon Wasp
Metopius sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body~14mm)
Dorsal
Profile
Wing venation
Body
Close up
Anterior
Released, cleaning wings
Ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Ichneumon Wasp
Wasp: Ichneumonidae
Orange Caterpillar Parasite Wasp
Netelia producta
Na
ema
Other Common NamesRed Jacket Wasp or Red Soldier Wasp

Dangerous looking wasp, but quite placid.
3 purple jewels (actually 3 Ocelli, simple eyes) on top of its head between the compound eyes.
Large wasp with varying shades of light brown to orange across the body.
Clear wings.
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Velvet Ant
Wasp: Mutillidae
Black Velvet Ant
Bothriomutilla sp ES1
Na
em
These are actually wasps. But the females are wingless and look like ants; hence the common name.
Wingless Female
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Velvet Ant
Wasp: Mutillidae
Gold Ring Velvet Ant
Bothriomutilla sp ES2
Na
em
 
Wingless Female
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Velvet Ant
Wasp: Mutillidae
Velvet Ant
Mutillidae sp ES1
Na
a
 
Wingless Female
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Velvet Ant
Wasp: Mutillidae
Red Velvet Ant
Mutillidae sp ES2
Na
em
 
Wingless Female
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Spider Wasp
Wasp: Pompilidae
Spider Wasp
Calopompilus sp
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Spider Wasp
Wasp: Pompilidae
Orange Spider Wasp
Cryptocheilus sp
Na
em
Mainly black wasp with bright orange head, tail, feelers & legs.
Again has 3 purple jewels (actually Ocelli, simple eyes) on its head
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Spider Wasp
Wasp: Pompilidae
Yellow Antennae Black Spider Wasp
Fabriogenia sp
Na
em
 
Back
Flying
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Spider Wasp
Wasp: Pompilidae
Zebra Spider Wasp
Turneromyia sp
Na
em
Similar Species: Black Sand-dauber Wasp
 
Video:
Zebra Spider Wasp Digging (32Mb)
Abdomen
Mandibles
Hunting
Dragging a Spider
Front, with Cob-web
Back
Profile
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Parasitic Wasp
Wasp: Pteromalidae
Metallic Blue Parasitic Wasp
Pteromalidae sp ES1
Na
em
Thank you Dr Ken Walker for confirming the identification of this species

Thank you Graeme Cocks for identifying this species for us
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Parasitoid Wasp
Wasp: Scelionidae
Small Black Parasitoid Wasp
Scelionidae sp
Na
em
 
Dorsal (body<5mm)
Profile
Ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Scoliid Wasp
Wasp: Scoliidae
Yellow Hairy Flower Wasp
Laevicampsomeris formosa
Na
m
 
Dorsal
Profile
Ventral
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Scoliid Wasp
Wasp: Scoliidae
2 Spotted Blue Hairy Flower Wasp
Laeviscolia frontalis
Na
em
This is the 1st record for this family in South Australia on the ALA website (www.ala.org.au). Females have shorter antennae than the males, and the males seem to be smaller. Different sub-species can also have yellow shoulders.
In Melaleuca
Female, cold from fridge (body ~30mm)
Female, don't try this at home
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Mud Dauber & Sand Wasp
Wasp: Sphecidae
Thread-waisted Wasp
Ammophila sp
Na
em
Other Common NameClub Wasp
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Mud Dauber & Sand Wasp
Wasp: Sphecidae
Giant Digger Wasp
Sphex carbonicolor
Na
em
Thank you Kate Sandiford for identifying this species for us

Probably the largest wasp in Australia, with the body nearly 40mm long. Sorry for the poor quality photo's. I was still learning to use the new insect boxes (& I suspect I was nervous!). This one's body is covered in white hair, is black and has a brown/golden hue to it's wings. It's mandibles are something you don't want attacking you. At first I thought it was a hook. Then realised it was two crossed mandibles that were much bigger than any spider fangs I've seen! Why I captured it I'll never know. I can't remember doing it, I was obviously in shock
OR JUST STUPID. I originally identified this back in Feb as Prionyx globosus. But Kate used the key here to identify it for us. zookeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=5995
While it looks like the antennae have 9, the end one bends so must be 10.
This is the 1st record for this species in South Australia on the ALA website (www.ala.org.au).
Female, profile (body ~37mm)
Female, Wing Venation
Female, Face
Female, close up
Female, 10 antenna segments
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Mud Dauber & Sand Wasp
Wasp: Sphecidae
Black Digger Wasp
Sphex cognata
Na
em
SynonymSphex cognatus
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Mud Dauber & Sand Wasp
Wasp: Sphecidae
Golden Digger Wasp
Sphex ermineus
Na
em
 
Profile
Mouth
Back
Face
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Tiphiid Wasp
Wasp: Tiphiidae
Large Yellow Flower Wasp
Catocheilus sp
Na
em
As with other Tiphiidae flower wasps, the female is much smaller & wingless. She may also be blind, or at least have poor vision. This is our 1st Tiphiidae found on Ellura and luckily we not only saw & photographed them mating (proves male/female relationship), but also caught them to get sizes and detailed photographs.
We released her were found where she'll find a beetle to parasitise with her now fertile eggs.
Even with his large size, he had a lot of trouble flying with her and allowed us to capture them.
While similar in appearance, with the naked eye, to the European Wasp, this species is much larger and has a cigar shaped abdomen. On closer inspection, and with photographs, the differences are much clearer.
Male, dorsal (body~25mm)
Male, profile
Male, anterior
Male, wing venation
Male, ventral
Female, dorsal (body~11mm)
Female, profile
Female, ventral
Pair, copulating (rotated)
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Tiphiid Wasp
Wasp: Tiphiidae
Flower Wasp
Eirone sp
Na
a
 
Mating
Male
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Tiphiid Wasp
Wasp: Tiphiidae
Flower Wasp
Rhagigaster sp
Na
a
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Tiphiid Wasp
Wasp: Tiphiidae
Flower Wasp
Tachynomyia sp
Na
a
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Potter Wasp
Wasp: Vespidae
Large Mud-nesting Wasp
Abispa ephippium
Na
em
Other Common NamesAustralian Hornet, Dauber Wasp, Large Mudnest Wasp, Large Mudwasp, Mud Dauber, Potter Wasp
 
Back
Abdomen
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Potter Wasp
Wasp: Vespidae
Large Mud-nesting Wasp
Abispa sp
Na
em
SynonymAbispa abispa

Other Common NamesAustralian Hornet, Dauber Wasp, Large Mudnest Wasp, Large Mudwasp, Mud Dauber, Potter Wasp

Similar Species: Large Mud-nesting Wasp Mimicking Fly
 
Dorsal
Rear
Front
Profile
Waist
Face
Throat
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Potter Wasp
Wasp: Vespidae
Orange Potter Wasp
Delta bicinctus
Na
ema
SynonymEumenes bicincta

Large deep orange wasp with black stripes
They make a mud nest and fill it with a larva for it's offspring to feed on.
The nest is a series of individual cells.
Walking on Water, profile -EXTRA-
Walking on Water, front -EXTRA-
Head
Back
Starting Nest, Filling with Food Lava
First Cell Sealed
Second Cell Started, Next Day
2nd Cell Sealed, 3rd Cell, showing Food
Nest Finished >1 month after start
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Potter Wasp
Wasp: Vespidae
Mud-nesting Wasp
Paralastor sp ES1
Na
em
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Potter Wasp
Wasp: Vespidae
Ringed Mud-nesting Wasp
Paralastor sp ES2
Na
a
 
Ant Bee Wasp
Hymenoptera
Potter Wasp
Wasp: Vespidae
Paralastor Wasp
Paralastor sp ES3
Na
em
 
Ventral
Abdomen (body~13mm)
Face
Wing venation

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